Medical Research Council's ME/CFS Literature Review

filfla4

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I came across this literature review and thought it might be of interest. http://www.mrc.ac.uk/Utilities/Documentrecord/index.htm?d=MRC006509

This was prepared for a workshop by the Medical Research Council (UK) held in November 2009.

A search on Scopus was run using the following search terms and limits:
Limits
Articles published or entered onto Scopus from 2004 2009.
Search Terms
A search was run using the following search terms:
CFS/ME OR chronic fatigue syndrome OR myalgic encephalomyelitis OR myalgic
encephalopathy.
 

Sasha

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Yikes! It is a 351-page collection of abstracts over the last five years, completely unsummarised, about two per page. Still, at least it exists!
 

filfla4

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Yep, I gave up going through it but I thought I should post it, just in case some brighter brain than mine will find it useful! :)
 

Sasha

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Yes, good catch! Thanks for posting it - it's good that the MRC are at least doing something!
 

gracenote

All shall be well . . .
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Thanks so much, filfla4. This is great.

It is searchable, and the abstracts are categorized in the following sections:

Autonomic dysfunction including cardiovascular abnormalities
Epidemiology and phenotyping
Fatigue and exercise
Genetics and new technological platforms
Imaging
Immune dysregulation and infection
Neuroendocrinology
Neuropsychology
Pain
Sleep
Social and behavioral aspects
Treatment
Other
 

Hope123

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Interesting, thanks for posting this.

They used a service called Scopus to get these references. I am not familiar with Scopus so I don't know what databases it does or doesn't cover. (Any librarians here?) This is important because I find many times, great CFS research articles are not Pubmed-indexed and miss being reviewed anywhere.

For most scientific reviews, the people doing the review usually have some details about the databases and how they went about their search described somewhere (e.g. keywords used, exclusion criteria, etc.) as this has an impact on what the pick or don't pick up.