ME Awareness Week press release of NHS rehab service for CFS (and newspaper article)

Dolphin

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(Not a recommendation)

(From press release) Dr Collings, whose interest in CFS/ME was sparked by his work in stroke rehabilitation, said the condition - which typically affects high achievers and people with obsessional personalities - is still stigmatised.
===============
http://tinyurl.com/33lwbdl
i.e.
http://www.southend.nhs.uk/NR/rdonl...E8C87BBB4DE1/0/NR20MEawarenessweekMay2010.pdf

Southend University Hospital
NHS Foundation Trust

News Release

PJS/10/20 6 May 2010
ME clinic gets Margaret back on her feet

After a series of viral infections, Margaret Wigglesworth found she was spending more time off sick than she was at work. Each bout left her more exhausted so that even the simplest of tasks was a major challenge.

Various doctors told her the blinding headaches, nausea and fainting spells were 'all in the mind' until she reached the stage when she was no longer able to put one foot in front of the other.

Margaret, 53, from Basildon, said: ""Energy was just oozing out of me like a tap. Then my vision went, my speech and memory went and I felt spaced out like I was in a bubble."

After a long and arduous struggle to get help, Margaret eventually found a sympathetic doctor who understood about ME (Myalgic Encaphalomyelitis), also known as Chronic Fatigue Syndrome and she was referred to Southend University Hospital's Chronic Fatigue Syndrome/ME clinic.

When she first attended, she could only hobble along with two sticks. Even if she parked in a disabled bay when shopping, she had insufficient energy to get much further.

She said: "One day I sat down in the aisle and cried because I had gone past the milk and just could not go back for it."

As well as seeing consultant physician Dr Tony Collings at the clinic, Margaret has also received help from a physiotherapist and an occupational therapist and is now hoping she will be able to do a few hours of work each week.

She said: "It was such a relief to find people who understand what I have been going through and can help me build up my energy. I just wish I had been referred to the clinic earlier. I have spent nightmare years trying to get recognition."

As well as now managing without her sticks, Margaret no longer relies on microwaved meals and is getting 'more adventurous' with her cooking.

"I am concentrating on the quality of my walking and just adding a few extra yards each time. I can now go shopping without losing my energy levels and feeling dead."

Southend University Hospital runs the Chronic Fatigue Syndrome/ME service for the whole of Essex with clinics at:

. Tyrell's health wing, Seamore Avenue, Benfleet . Broomfield Hospital, Court Road, Chelmsford . Colchester primary care centre, Turner Road, Colchester

Anyone wishing to access the service should contact their GP in the first instance.

Dr Collings, whose interest in CFS/ME was sparked by his work in stroke rehabilitation, said the condition - which typically affects high achievers and people with obsessional personalities - is still stigmatised.

"It is difficult for other people to accept because there is nothing to see.
But it is very
real and can be quite devastating in its effects. It affects all ages but is most common in late middle age, and affects more women than men. Although some patients manage to hold down a job, others are totally bed-bound and need full-time care."

Next week (May 9 to 15) is ME Awareness Week. ME is also known as chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) and sometimes diagnosed as post viral fatigue syndrome (PVFS).

More information is available from www.afme.org.uk ________________________________________________________________________
For more information please contact Pat Stone on 01702 385048 Fax 01702 385953 Email pat.stone@southend.nhs.uk Visit the new hospital website on www.southend.nhs.uk


====================

Under the photo:
"Margaret Wigglesworth - on the road to recovery from ME"

Essex Echo
http://tinyurl.com/2w8v7yn i.e.
http://www.echo-news.co.uk/news/8182311.Clinic_helps_people_like_Margaret_co
pe_with_ME/

Also Southend Standard
http://www.southendstandard.co.uk/news/southend/8182311.Clinic_helps_people_
like_Margaret_cope_with_ME/

Basildon Recorder
http://www.basildonrecorder.co.uk/news/echo/8182311.Clinic_helps_people_like
_Margaret_cope_with_ME/

Clinic helps people like Margaret cope with ME 10:00am Tuesday 25th May 2010

Print Email Share Comments(0) By Michelle Archard >

PATIENTS have praised a specialist clinic in south Essex which is helping hundreds of people cope with a crippling condition that can often go undiagnosed.

Southend Hospital's chronic fatigue syndrome and ME clinic has a number of branches in Essex, including one in Benfleet, helping people get their lives back on track.

Patients like Margaret Wigglesworth have benefited from their expertise and she spoke out to mark ME Awareness Week.

Margaret said: "It was such a relief to find people who understand what I have been going through and can help me build up my energy. I just wish I had been referred to the clinic earlier. I have spent nightmare years trying to get recognition."

Before being diagnosed, Margaret suffered a series of viral infections each leaving her more exhausted so that even the simplest of tasks was a major challenge.

Various doctors told her the blinding headaches, nausea and fainting spells were all in the mind until she reached the stage when she was no longer able to put one foot in front of the other.

Margaret, 53, from Basildon, said: "Energy was just oozing out of me like a tap. Then my vision went, my speech and memory went and I felt spaced out, like I was in a bubble."

After a long struggle to get help, Margaret eventually found a sympathetic doctor who understood ME, also known as chronic fatigue syndrome, and she was referred to one of the hospital's clinics.

When she first attended, she could only hobble along with two sticks.

As well as seeing consultant physician Dr Tony Collings at the clinic, Margaret has also received help from a physiotherapist and an occupational therapist and is now walking unaided and beginning to recover some energy.
She is hoping she will eventually be able to do a few hours of work each week.

Dr Collings said the condition - which typically affects high achievers and people with obsessional personalities - is still stigmatised.

He said:"It is difficult for other people to accept because there is nothing to see. But it is very real and can be quite devastating in its effects. It affects all ages, but is most common in late middle age, and affects more women than men. Although some patients manage to hold down a job, others are totally bed-bound and need full-time care."

Anyone wishing to access the service should contact their GP.
 

gracenote

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Dr Collings, whose interest in CFS/ME was sparked by his work in stroke rehabilitation, said the condition - which typically affects high achievers and people with obsessional personalities - is still stigmatised.
Sigh. I wonder why.