Learn about series- It is vital Electrolytes are corrected as you recover from the dysfunctional body state that is ME/CFS.

CSMLSM

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My own experience tells me how important these elements are to our health and that we are depleted of them by our dysfunctional state ME/CFS.

Have you had times a treatment has been working and you get a stall, maybe your electrolytes are depleted because of the new and more vigorous activity that you will ultimately be doing as a result of any improvements gained from the original treatment that was helping.

Here are some videos that help explain these Electolytes and what is involved in the lacking of these nutrients.

I myself have just started taking potassium citrate recently. I believe my attraction to coffee in recent times was because it contains potassium. I had recently cut right down as it is not good for adrenals when trying to prevent them being stimulated artificially (caffeine). This lead to less energy, less stamina, restless legs abit (might be related) adding potassium citrate seemed to correct the situation.

Hope these videos are helpful,
CSMLSM

POTASSIUM: The Most Important Electrolyte Yet an Ignored Epidemic - Dr. Berg - YouTube
Dr. Eric Berg DC Jan 2, 2022 15.50min

Learn more about potassium and why it’s the most important electrolyte.
0:00 Introduction: Potassium is the most important electrolyte
0:10 Why potassium is important
0:40 What is an electrolyte?
3:52 What does potassium do?
9:35 Potassium deficiency causes
15:34 Are you consuming enough salad?

Today, I will cover what you need to know about potassium.

An electrolyte is an electrically charged mineral. The body uses electrolytes for various things, such as:
• To help conduct nerve impulses
• To help contract and relax muscles
• To help maintain pH in the body
• To help push fluid through the body

30% of all of the energy in the body comes from the sodium-potassium pump. The purpose of the pump is basically to maintain cellular energy.

What does potassium do?:
• It provides energy
• It provides endurance during exercise
• It helps prevent cramping
• It helps prevent arrhythmias
• It helps prevent twitching
• It helps prevent tremors
• It helps prevent constipation
• It helps prevent vascular calcification
• It helps prevent insomnia
• It helps prevent insulin resistance
• It helps prevent high blood pressure
• It protects the kidneys
• It helps prevent edema
• It counters sodium toxicity
• It helps make stomach acid
• It helps prevent gout

Causes of a potassium deficiency:
• A lack of potassium in the diet
• Vomiting
• Diarrhea
• Diuretics
• Stress
• Sugar
• Refined carbs
• Keto
• Alcohol
• Consuming excess fluids
• Sweating
• Diabetes
• Fasting

The best sources of potassium:
• Leafy greens (7-10 cups per day)
• Avocados
• Salmon
• Nuts and nut butters
• Seeds
• An electrolyte powder high in potassium
 

CSMLSM

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What Does an Electrolyte Do? - YouTube
Dr. Eric Berg DC Apr 24, 2021 5.17min

We know electrolytes are important, but what do they actually do? Find out.

Timestamps
0:00 Electrolytes
0:10 What do electrolytes do?
4:30 Bulletproof your immune system *free course

Today I want to cover what electrolytes do, with a special focus on five specific electrolytes.

1. Sodium:
• Hydrates
• Is involved in oxygen transport
• Works with potassium to generate electrical potential (the sodium-potassium pump)
• Decreased sodium can lead to weakness, tiredness, and low endurance

2. Potassium:
• Supports the nerve and muscle interaction
• Works with sodium to generate electrical potential (the sodium-potassium pump)
• Decreased potassium can lead to weakness and tiredness

3. Magnesium:
• Controls the absorption of sodium and potassium
• Is associated with oxygen
• Supports the relaxation of the muscle
• May help prevent muscle cramps
• May be necessary for workouts (especially long or intense workouts)
• Decreased magnesium may lead to muscle cramps and low endurance

4. Calcium:
• Supports muscle contraction
• Supports neuromuscular excitability
• Decreased calcium can lead to tetany, muscle cramps, and skeletal muscle weakness

5. Chloride:
• Supports hydration

FREE COURSE➜ ➜ http://bit.ly/BulletproofImmuneSystem...

Dr. Eric Berg DC Bio:
Dr. Berg, age 56, is a chiropractor who specializes in Healthy Ketosis & Intermittent Fasting. He is the author of the best-selling book The Healthy Keto Plan, and is the Director of Dr. Berg Nutritionals. He no longer practices, but focuses on health education through social media.


Disclaimer:
Dr. Eric Berg received his Doctor of Chiropractic degree from Palmer College of Chiropractic in 1988. His use of “doctor” or “Dr.” in relation to himself solely refers to that degree. Dr. Berg is a licensed chiropractor in Virginia, California, and Louisiana, but he no longer practices chiropractic in any state and does not see patients so he can focus on educating people as a full time activity, yet he maintains an active license. This video is for general informational purposes only. It should not be used to self-diagnose and it is not a substitute for a medical exam, cure, treatment, diagnosis, and prescription or recommendation. It does not create a doctor-patient relationship between Dr. Berg and you. You should not make any change in your health regimen or diet before first consulting a physician and obtaining a medical exam, diagnosis, and recommendation. Always seek the advice of a physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition.

#keto #ketodiet #weightloss

Thanks for watching! I hope this helps explain what electrolytes do.
 

Wishful

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My own experience tells me how important these elements are to our health and that we are depleted of them by our dysfunctional state ME/CFS.
My experience is the opposite. I've never noticed a difference from adding extra electrolytes, or from sweating/urinating more than usual without supplementing electrolytes.
 
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Thanks for posting, @CSMLSM very useful!

I'm doing a Potassium aspartate, citrate and OROTATE combined.

Recently lost most electrolytes, BP Plummeted to extremely low levels.

BP cuff is now not working, built in senescence. Im stuck unable to purchase another plastic device built to end up at the landfill permanently.

Yesterday: I read about a miracle magnesium that contained SEVEN kinds!
 

Hip

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FREE COURSE➜ ➜ http://bit.ly/BulletproofImmuneSystem...

Dr. Eric Berg DC Bio:
Dr. Berg, age 56, is a chiropractor who specializes in Healthy Ketosis & Intermittent Fasting. He is the author of the best-selling book The Healthy Keto Plan, and is the Director of Dr. Berg Nutritionals. He no longer practices, but focuses on health education through social media.

Eric Berg (c. 1972) is an American quack, antivaxxer, chiropractor, cholesterol denialist, conspiracy theorist, scientologist and ketogenic diet advocate. Berg promotes pseudoscientific health advice and quackery. Berg is not a medical doctor. Berg practiced chiropractic for 29 years and is now a full-time YouTube blogger
Source: https://rationalwiki.org/wiki/Eric_Berg
 

Wishful

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Im stuck unable to purchase another plastic device built to end up at the landfill permanently.
Even products that were designed to have parts replaced eventually reach the 'no more parts available' point. I went to buy a replacement chainsaw bar tip, since those were meant to be replaced when they wear out. Well, the chainsaw is several decades old, and still working well, but sorry, no parts available. I might be able to find parts online, at least for a little while longer. Parts for my 1985 Toyota pickup are getting hard to find too. Not much selection available for tires; that might be what forces me to scrap the truck.

I've heard some talk about legislation to require repairability of products, but I don't expect that to pass easily. At some point in the future, it might be possible to have replacement parts printed on demand, so legislation can require production data to be archived and available, and products designed to be repairable, but there's more profit in selling new products.

Oh, for that centuries-old axe, still going strong after several replacement heads and handles. ;)
 

lenora

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Yes, it's very true that electrolytes are important in our bodies. Even more so as we age.

It's easy to drink too much water, coffee or tea which can leave us low in certain electrolytes. I've had seizures b/c of electrolyte imbalance and now have two different types of epilepsy & I'll be on meds for the rest of my life. So please take this seriously. Of course I'm sure that at age 75 that also plays a role, but.......!

I live in a hot climate so it's even more important to be aware of this problem for those of you who are. A banana a day is a good idea for those who need potassium. Fluid intake may be more moderate than you think....and don't totally give up iodized salt.

Unfortunately a good calcium supply does not prevent osteoporosis in everyone. This has been a problem for me since my late 30's, early 40's....a big problem.

Stomach problems (depending on what they are) can also cause imbalances. Yours, Lenora.
 

CSMLSM

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Yes, it's very true that electrolytes are important in our bodies. Even more so as we age.

It's easy to drink too much water, coffee or tea which can leave us low in certain electrolytes. I've had seizures b/c of electrolyte imbalance and now have two different types of epilepsy & I'll be on meds for the rest of my life. So please take this seriously. Of course I'm sure that at age 75 that also plays a role, but.......!

I live in a hot climate so it's even more important to be aware of this problem for those of you who are. A banana a day is a good idea for those who need potassium. Fluid intake may be more moderate than you think....and don't totally give up iodized salt.

Unfortunately a good calcium supply does not prevent osteoporosis in everyone. This has been a problem for me since my late 30's, early 40's....a big problem.

Stomach problems (depending on what they are) can also cause imbalances. Yours, Lenora.
I am sorry to hear about the epilepsy you have to suffer it is a brutal condition. I would just like to share that vitamin K2 helps with absorbing calcium into the bones. It is suggested to take K2 when taking high vitamin D because of the chance of removing calcium from the bones because of the high D. I believe older people are given calcium and D tablets but not given K2 with it. Just something to think about maybe.
Yes stomach issues, improper digestion and absorption can cause so many issues, especially low vitamin B12. Our immune system and nervous system play a large part in our intestines and when one is off it affects the others. We really should class this condition as Neuro/Immune/Gastro.
 

lenora

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Hello @C SML SM......Yes, my epilepsy (2 types were brought on slowly b/c of the imbalance of electrolytes.

I also had a heart attack that summer and presently have 7 stents. Autoimmune encephalitis at a later date....and almost nothing was know about it then. Today, there's far more information....although I have reached the point where I'm fighting so many different things.

You're quite correct in saying that calcium, D and K2 all together for proper bone formation. My osteoporosis began early in life....genetic?, certainly not lack of exercise as I walked everywhere when young and continued that and bike riding most of my life. I was eventually able to return to walking (although much less mileage) and just do what I can for myself. I'm presently nursing 5 pelvic fractures and 1 vertebra (second break). So I know that I don't represent the best of us....but I'm also 75. Congenital birth defects left me with other neurological conditions.

I wouldn't worry about what transpires in your world....I'm far from a good example. I agree, first we went from no information to too much information and some of it just plain wrong or confusing. How can I expect even the best of doctors to figure out an answer to this puzzle that is my body. I expect empathy, their knowledge and help as much as possible. Treatments change over the years....at least I've seen that. What was once commonly done years ago has been stopped. We're forever evolving, just like our meds. Today is not forever, but you know that. Good health to you. Yours, Lenora.