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Lactic acid buildup?

Messages
33
When I stay still and don't move for a while, I get whole body soreness and achiness, mood changes, and the need to be on constant move. It feels like lactic acid buildup, like being hit by a truck, or low-grade inflammation (my high-sensitivity CRP was not high), but I am not sure what's the cause. Moving around seems to mask it away a little, and sitting still increases the aches. It might be related to post-exertional malaise. Anyone get this? What helps? Thanks!
 

helperofearth123

Senior Member
Messages
202
Could be circulation related. Moving the blood around manually by moving around a bit could be why it feels a little better to move around. Basically the bodies natural energy input to waste product output is done through circulation, so if thats not circulating properly it will cause you to feel crap all over including possible mood changes by the brain being a bit clogged too. I don't think its lactic acid buildup as thats what happens when we exert. Don't know what to suggest sorry other than to make sure you've been tested for POTS.
 

pattismith

Senior Member
Messages
3,926
this kind of symptom may be related to ion channels dysfunction...

For example, in Hypokalemic Periodic Paralysis (a genetic disease of calcium or sodium ion channels), when the muscle is relaxing after exercising, potassium enters in the cells and drops in the blood which is concommittent with symptoms arising.

Moving around (when possible), or taking quick liquid potassium releaves the problem in this disease.

My blood potassium was a bit low normal, so I use KCl to help my muscles when needed.

It's important to know that KCl decreases B12 absorption.
 
Messages
33
Could be circulation related. Moving the blood around manually by moving around a bit could be why it feels a little better to move around. Basically the bodies natural energy input to waste product output is done through circulation, so if thats not circulating properly it will cause you to feel crap all over including possible mood changes by the brain being a bit clogged too. I don't think its lactic acid buildup as thats what happens when we exert. Don't know what to suggest sorry other than to make sure you've been tested for POTS.

That's also possible, I do have circulation problems and possibly not enough blood entering the brain. Pentoxifylline makes me feel generally better for example. Don't know if it would be safe to take it long-term. POTS I have thought about, might have it to some degree. At least get orthostatic hypotension sometimes.
 
Messages
33
this kind of symptom may be related to ion channels dysfunction...

For example, in Hypokalemic Periodic Paralysis (a genetic disease of calcium or sodium ion channels), when the muscle is relaxing after exercising, potassium enters in the cells and drops in the blood which is concommittent with symptoms arising.

Moving around (when possible), or taking quick liquid potassium releaves the problem in this disease.

My blood potassium was a bit low normal, so I use KCl to help my muscles when needed.

It's important to know that KCl decreases B12 absorption.

How much potassium is safe to take/try generally if I don't have serious potassium deficiency? The labs have usually been pretty mid-range, around 4.1.
 

pattismith

Senior Member
Messages
3,926
How much potassium is safe to take/try generally if I don't have serious potassium deficiency? The labs have usually been pretty mid-range, around 4.1.

I found this document to be very useful for potassium supplementing:

http://www.periodicparalysis.org/CMFiles/Managing PP 101.pdf

it is said that oral potassium is not risky as IV potassium.
And:

Each 20 mEq KCl orally = + 0.5 mEq K in blood

so for you 20 mEq will raise your potassium from 4.1 to 4.6 which is in the normal range.

Edit: the document quotes two brands of potassium, one dose (20-25 mEq) must be added to water:

•Effer-K®
•Klor-Con®
 
Last edited:
Messages
33
I found this document to be very useful for potassium supplementing:

http://www.periodicparalysis.org/CMFiles/Managing PP 101.pdf

it is said that oral potassium is not risky as IV potassium.
And:

Each 20 mEq KCl orally = + 0.5 mEq K in blood

so for you 20 mEq will raise your potassium from 4.1 to 4.6 which is in the normal range.

Edit: the document quotes two brands of potassium, one dose (20-25 mEq) must be added to water:

•Effer-K®
•Klor-Con®

Thank you!
 

keenly

Senior Member
Messages
814
Location
UK
Could be circulation related. Moving the blood around manually by moving around a bit could be why it feels a little better to move around. Basically the bodies natural energy input to waste product output is done through circulation, so if thats not circulating properly it will cause you to feel crap all over including possible mood changes by the brain being a bit clogged too. I don't think its lactic acid buildup as thats what happens when we exert. Don't know what to suggest sorry other than to make sure you've been tested for POTS.

Severe CFS patients are exerting just by being alive. We consume excessive oxygen even at REST.
 
Messages
56
Have you tried self-massage? To increase circulation, also helps calm the nervous system / helps with desensitization. Also for me it helps to avoid foods or drinks with lactic acid due to the fermentation process, such as kombucha or pickled vegetables.