Junkfood triggered dysphagia

Wolfcub

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It might be one (or several) food additives in whatever you ate which trigger that symptom.
I guess you could experiment to find out which one it might be? Then avoid it like the plague in future?

It might have just been one particular item you ate which caused that?

Some of those things are really nasty chemicals.

Water/electrolytes. Re-hydration might help flush it all out?
 

lenora

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Hello @ KaitisTired....I also have dysphagia occasionally and find that drinking water first helps. I do stay away from items like chips (which I used to like, and still do, but they aren't worth the choking spells). Over the years I've learned there are other triggers and I also avoid them. The chips are too dry, besides I'm trying to lose lbs. put on by new medications. I'm fairly small and I don't like it. Besides, I have rib problems that can make breathing difficult at times...and I look just like I'm as happy and healthy as can be!

If mouthfuls are too large this can also happen, but not swallowing water before eating dry, crispy foods is a guarantee that something will occur. It's worse if I have a cough/cold of some sort. Unfortunately there are no easy answers and you'll learn the cause as this happens to you over time. Pills are terrible for this, that's why drinking water, tea, etc., first will "help the medicine go down" without incident. And Wolfcub's right...having something to drink right after may also help, although then I've sometimes have an even stronger attack. Good luck. Yours, Lenora.
 
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My sister-in-law has dysphagia, and she finds that certain foods are more irritating to her throat than others. With some foods it's an ingredient that triggers the pain (such as something acidic), and with others it's the hardness or texture (such as crusty bread). If she eats irritating, they feel like they 'stick,' and that feeling can persist and affect her ability to eat for a few days. By being very careful about what she consumes, she can reduce the discomfort. As a result of that, she's able to eat a lot more easily. Although sometimes she will eat a bit of a favorite comfort food 🍕 even though she knows it will cause her problems because it's just too tasty to resist.

There are certain foods that can trigger discomfort in people with dysphagia. On top of that, how foods are eaten can trigger dysphagia. I've seen it suggested that people take small bites (teaspoon-sized), and also to eat very slowly, taking time to chew each bite, swallow it, and give it time to go down. I've also heard that it might be helpful to be sure that you're sitting up straight while eating, and then stay upright for a little while afterward.
 
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My sister-in-law has dysphagia, and she finds that certain foods are more irritating to her throat than others. With some foods it's an ingredient that triggers the pain (such as something acidic), and with others it's the hardness or texture (such as crusty bread). If she eats irritating, they feel like they 'stick,' and that feeling can persist and affect her ability to eat for a few days. By being very careful about what she consumes, she can reduce the discomfort. As a result of that, she's able to eat a lot more easily. Although sometimes she will eat a bit of a favorite comfort food 🍕 even though she knows it will cause her problems because it's just too tasty to resist.

There are certain foods that can trigger discomfort in people with dysphagia. On top of that, how foods are eaten can trigger dysphagia. I've seen it suggested that people take small bites (teaspoon-sized), and also to eat very slowly, taking time to chew each bite, swallow it, and give it time to go down. I've also heard that it might be helpful to be sure that you're sitting up straight while eating, and then stay upright for a little while afterward.
Thanks
 

Wolfcub

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@KaitIsTired Do you have Sjorgren's syndrome? Or just a generally dry mouth?
My Aunt had a salivary gland stone removed many years ago, but since then, can't produce enough saliva, so has to be careful what she eats, and how. Even something like a sandwich can be too dry for her, She has a glass of sparkling water on the side whenever she eats, and takes small sips while eating.
 
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@KaitIsTired Do you have Sjorgren's syndrome? Or just a generally dry mouth?
My Aunt had a salivary gland stone removed many years ago, but since then, can't produce enough saliva, so has to be careful what she eats, and how. Even something like a sandwich can be too dry for her, She has a glass of sparkling water on the side whenever she eats, and takes small sips while eating.
I haven’t been diagnosed with that but I will look into it