Japenese researchers claim diagnostic test discovered

bakercape

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I don't know if it's been posted elsewhere on this site but Japenese researchers are claiming they found a chemical which is suppressed by dopamine that is abnormally high in CFS patients. I believe they said like 50 times higher in CFS patients. They have not been published yet.

I'm surprised this is not getting more press. Hopefully it leads to something positive for us. A diagnostic marker would be nice.

Not sure how to do links on here yet but I saw it posted on the pro health board.
 
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bakercape
Do you have a link even in japanease? I can read it with friends help.


I don't know if it's been posted elsewhere on this site but Japenese researchers are claiming they found a chemical which is suppressed by dopamine that is abnormally high in CFS patients. I believe they said like 50 times higher in CFS patients. They have not been published yet.

I'm surprised this is not getting more press. Hopefully it leads to something positive for us. A diagnostic marker would be nice.

Not sure how to do links on here yet but I saw it posted on the pro health board.
 

gracenote

All shall be well . . .
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breakthrough made in diagnosing CFS

January 10, 2010

Breakthrough made in diagnosing chronic fatigue syndrome, Japanese researchers report

[Note: The following press release was distributed Jan 11 via from the Japanese news site Daily Yomiuri Shimbun. We have not yet identified a journal article or other publication further detailing the study.* Meanwhile, others argue that ME/CFS patients often test low in alpha-MSH, not high, so details will be welcome.]

Researchers have discovered a protein in blood that can be used to diagnose chronic fatigue syndrome, a breakthrough that could help detect the ailment during physical checkups.

There are diagnostic criteria for chronic fatigue syndrome - a disorder involving extreme fatigue of unknown cause that continues for at least six months - that rely primarily on subjective symptoms, but there have been no objective markers such as blood tests.

The research team led by Hiroshi Kiyama, a professor of anatomy [in the Graduate School of Medicine] at Osaka City University, examined the intermediate lobes of the pituitary glands of rats in which they induced extreme fatigue by making them exercise for five consecutive days. They found that the lobes excreted extraordinarily high amounts of a protein called alpha-MSH and that alpha-MSH levels in the animals' blood also increased.

The neurotransmitter dopamine inhibits the secretion of alpha-MSH, but the rats' ability to produce dopamine declined as their fatigue grew.

The group also tested the levels of alpha-MSH in the blood of 57 people diagnosed with chronic fatigue syndrome and the blood of 30 healthy people.

The average level among the 37 people who had been diagnosed with chronic fatigue syndrome less than five years before was about 50 percent higher than in the healthy people.

Source: Daily Yomiuri Shimbun (Japan) press release Jan 11, 2009
 
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I don't know if it's been posted elsewhere on this site but Japenese researchers are claiming they found a chemical which is suppressed by dopamine that is abnormally high in CFS patients. I believe they said like 50 times higher in CFS patients. They have not been published yet.

I'm surprised this is not getting more press. Hopefully it leads to something positive for us. A diagnostic marker would be nice.

Not sure how to do links on here yet but I saw it posted on the pro health board.
Just to let you know Bakercape, it was published under the latest research thread as Alpha MSH protein a potential biomarker for CFS - Japan and there is some discussion there.
 

starryeyes

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So they "fatigued" the rats to get this result? Maybe some PWC do have high amounts of alpha-MSH but I think it's just as likely that many others with CFS have low amounts. It's typical in CFS to have either too much or too little of various chemicals in our systems.

It's an interesting study but I doubt it can be used as a biomarker for CFS. For one thing, being "fatigued" is totally different than the illness known as CFS/ME.
 

Sing

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First of all--poor rats being abused that way! Secondly, I have thought low dopamine was involved in my ME/CFS. Dr. Richard Bruno who thinks ME/CFS has a great deal in common with Post Polio Syndrome and may, in fact, in some cases be it, describes damage to the reticular activating system and hypothalamus. The RAS is what produces dopamine.

Using his model, for some years I took a half of a Parlodel pill (1.25 mg?), as Parlodel helps the brain retain dopamine in the system. It had good effects for me like increasing my cognitive functioning, energy slightly and giving me back an interest in sex.

But leaving that aside, the enteroviruses or viruses can invade the lower brain area and damage those systems.

Sing