Iron is essential for the homeostasis of the human body.

SWAlexander

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" Introduction

Iron is essential for the homeostasis of the human body. It plays a central role in oxygen transport and utilization as well as in mitochondrial function.1 Historically, iron status has been assessed by measuring ferritin serum levels, and patients with low ferritin serum levels have been diagnosed with absolute iron deficiency (AID) or severe AID. In such patients, anaemia and skeletal muscle dysfunction is most likely present.2"


However, ferritin alone might not suffice to provide an accurate and reliable assessment of iron status, as it solely reflects stored iron. Transferrin saturation (TSAT) should be additionally measured to account for utilized iron. Measurement of both markers provides a more accurate description of iron status and can identify patients with a functional iron deficiency (FID).
More at: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1002/ehf2.13589
 

SWAlexander

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Wondering how many CFS`s have iron deficiency anemia but were never tested for celiac disease or spherocytosis. A recent report in the German "Ärzte Blatt" revealed that 80% of doctors never checked for celiac disease. Only my endocrinologist in the US checked once in 28 years.
 

Viala

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Wondering how many CFS`s have iron deficiency anemia but were never tested for celiac disease or spherocytosis. A recent report in the German "Ärzte Blatt" revealed that 80% of doctors never checked for celiac disease. Only my endocrinologist in the US checked once in 28 years.
I suspected iron deficiency in the beginning, tested blood iron and ferritin, everything was ok. But as usual these tests may miss something. The only way to check is to supplement iron for longer, hoping that it is the right form of iron supplement, yet this is not recommended if tests are ok. Celiac disease or not, many people may have problems with digestion and nutrient absorption.
 

SWAlexander

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I suspected iron deficiency in the beginning, tested blood iron and ferritin, everything was ok. But as usual these tests may miss something. The only way to check is to supplement iron for longer, hoping that it is the right form of iron supplement, yet this is not recommended if tests are ok. Celiac disease or not, many people may have problems with digestion and nutrient absorption.
Right. It also could be histamine, potassium, magnesium, bacterial and and and problem. But why not testing for the most dangerous first.
 
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Viala

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Right. It also could be histamine, potassium, magnesium, bacterial and and and problem. But why not testing for the most dangerous first.
Doctors don't think about testing adults for celiac disease, many still believe it is a disease of small children only, it is said that many people are still undiagnosed. Even when there is an evident problem with digestive system, they blame it mostly on stress, I've seen it so many times.

I've been gluten free for a long time now and haven't noticed any improvement in my energy levels, but I also didn't supplement iron, if that could help with CFS.
 

SWAlexander

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Doctors don't think about testing adults for celiac disease, many still believe it is a disease of small children only, it is said that many people are still undiagnosed. Even when there is an evident problem with digestive system, they blame it mostly on stress, I've seen it so many times.

I've been gluten free for a long time now and haven't noticed any improvement in my energy levels, but I also didn't supplement iron, if that could help with CFS.
That´s the problem: "Doctors don't think about testing adults for celiac disease, many still believe it is a disease of small children only,"

This is what science says: "Studies estimate that only about 3% of people with one or more copies of the HLA-DQ2.5 or HLA-DQ8 haplotypes develop celiac disease."
"Among people who develop celiac disease, about 90% have one or more copies of the HLA-DQ2.5 haplotype and about 5% have one or more copies of the HLA-DQ8 haplotype."
Other conditions
"People with certain health conditions are more likely to develop celiac disease. The prevalence of celiac disease increases to 3-12% among people with Down syndrome or Williams syndrome, and to approximately 5% for people with other autoimmune conditions like type 1 diabetes, arthritis, or Sjögren's syndrome. This is compared to the 1% prevalence of celiac disease in the general population."
 

BrightCandle

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I was tested for celiac disease after I told my GP I was having very bad reactions to all carbohydrates. When that came back negative they did nothing more on that information (failed with the first guess the patient must be lying!). They did do it, I was years into my condition at that point and was on the turning point from just headaches into everything else and symptoms were coming out fast.

I don't know how common it is to get tested for it but it certainly isn't the cause of what is ailing me and with time realised I need a very precise carbohydrate amount, too little and I am worse and too much and I also feel worse.
 

SWAlexander

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I was tested for celiac disease after I told my GP I was having very bad reactions to all carbohydrates. When that came back negative they did nothing more on that information (failed with the first guess the patient must be lying!). They did do it, I was years into my condition at that point and was on the turning point from just headaches into everything else and symptoms were coming out fast.

I don't know how common it is to get tested for it but it certainly isn't the cause of what is ailing me and with time realised I need a very precise carbohydrate amount, too little and I am worse and too much and I also feel worse.
I was tested in 2007. After my endocrinologist retired, other d´s did not believe its necessary, even though I showed them my DNA stated: "you have one of the two genetic variants in the HLA-DQA1 gene we tested.
That could mean, if it is not celiac disease, it could be spherocytosis, which also can lead to oxidative stress/headaches, digestion problems, etc.
 

pattismith

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" Introduction

Iron is essential for the homeostasis of the human body. It plays a central role in oxygen transport and utilization as well as in mitochondrial function.1 Historically, iron status has been assessed by measuring ferritin serum levels, and patients with low ferritin serum levels have been diagnosed with absolute iron deficiency (AID) or severe AID. In such patients, anaemia and skeletal muscle dysfunction is most likely present.2"


However, ferritin alone might not suffice to provide an accurate and reliable assessment of iron status, as it solely reflects stored iron. Transferrin saturation (TSAT) should be additionally measured to account for utilized iron. Measurement of both markers provides a more accurate description of iron status and can identify patients with a functional iron deficiency (FID).
More at: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1002/ehf2.13589
The normal ranges they use in this study are not the ranges my lab ni France uses!!:lol:
During my life I always was with ferritin between 11 and 24 and the minimum normal my lab was admitting was 20 whereas the lower cutoff value in the study is 30 for AID and 100 for FID. I wish new guidelines could be published on this question, it a matter of public health

AID was defined as ferritin < 100 μg/L or as ferritin < 30 μg/L (severe AID), and FID was defined as ferritin < 100 μg/L or ferritin 100–299 μg/L and transferrin saturation < 20%.
 

Viala

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The normal ranges they use in this study are not the ranges my lab ni France uses!!:lol:
During my life I always was with ferritin between 11 and 24 and the minimum normal my lab was admitting was 20 whereas the lower cutoff value in the study is 30 for AID and 100 for FID. I wish new guidelines could be published on this question, it a matter of public health
Just checked my labs, normal range starts with 15 lol, even lower. My ferritin wasn't that low, but according to this study, it's still iron deficiency.
 

SWAlexander

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pattismith
"Iron is essential for the homeostasis of the human body. It plays a central role in oxygen transport and utilization as well as in mitochondrial function."

This is the reason I ask, which of these cells become damaged and why? Is the spine not producing enough healthy cells or replacing the damaged cells.
Example: spherocytosis cells have an alife span of 20-40 days and are the most common cause of hemolytic anemia. Red-cell life span normal of 120 days by a variable degree.

"Spherocytosis causes your red blood cells to break down faster than healthy cells do, which can lead to anemia. If spherocytosis causes anemia, you may appear paler than normal. Other common symptoms of anemia from hereditary spherocytosis can include: fatigue."
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