Interesting Interview with Dr. James Adams, researcher at Arizona State University (ASU), re his Autism/Microbiome Phase 1 Study Results

Wally

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Here is an interesting interview conducted on 6/13/2019 on Del Bigtree’s HighWire Youtube Channel with Dr. James Adams, a researcher from Arizona State University (ASU), who is sharing results from his Autism/Microbiome Phase I Clinical Trial Using Fecal Transplants and his follow-up of this study two years later.

- Interview topic starts at approximately the 21 minute mark and ends at approximately the 47 minute mark.

For those who are not familiar with who Del Bigtree is or what this Youtube Channel is about, he is an investigative journalist and former producer of the daytime TV show “The Doctors” who left that job to help produce the movie/documentary “VAXXED” about Autism and a possible association with the MMR vaccine. From his experience investigating and working on this movie, he decided to produce a weekly show via Youtube to discuss the topics raised in the movie plus other health related issues.

(Note - This thread was posted for information about the 6/13/2019 interview with Dr. Adams and the ASU Autism/Microbiome Study. If you would like to post an opinion or start a discussion re the interviewer (Del Bigtree), the weekly Youtube “HighWire” Program or the movie “VAXXED”, please start a separate thread(s) about these topics.)
 
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ljimbo423

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What an amazing interview!! Thanks @Wally!

Results from the FMT were 45% reduction in Autism symptoms over 2 years.

Dr. James Adams says at 22:25- "over time, it just seems their brain is much healthier. Now they are able to learn language, interact socially, they have fewer behavioral problems"

At 27:20 he says- "Most of the children started the study with severe Autism. At the end of the study most of the children had either mild to moderate Autism or were below the cut-off of Autism."

This seems like good evidence to me, that the a disrupted microbiome caused neurological (brain) symptoms in these Autism patients and the FMT, reversed a lot of it. Why can't brain inflammation be causing many or most of the symptoms in ME/CFS? I think it can, as Jarred Younger is so passionately saying.

Because I feel so strongly about this, I'll even go one step further in saying that, I feel it's a disrupted microbiome, in ME/CFS, causing the brain inflammation Jarred Younger has found and symptoms.

Dr. Adams says the FDA is fast-tracking his FMT for Autism studies that are now underway, because it sounds "promising".


At 35:33 Dr. James Adams talks about a study done on mice- (from the transcript) -
Our role was to collect the stool samples from children with autism and from typical children we provided them to the group at Caltech they then infused them into mice, when those mice had offspring the mice who were injected with microbiota from healthy humans, those mice developed fine.

The mice that got bacteria from the children with autism, developed a series of autistic like symptoms, communication problems, behavior problems, anxiety, what's even more concerning is it depended on the severity of the child, if the child with autism was more severe, than the mice were more severe.

This is very powerful, one of the first indications of a mouse model based on something from a child with autism that their gut bacteria put in to a mouse can cause that Mouse's offspring to develop autism symptoms so that's why we think the mothers are so important because that's how you inherit most of your gut bacteria is from your mother.
 
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Wally

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Here is an article from Smithsonian Magazine published on 6/14/2019 covering this same topic, which also includes some additional information from Dr. Adams.
"There is a very high correlation between [gastrointestinal] severity and autism severity—for language, for social interaction, for behavior, all of the core symptoms of autism,” says Jim Adams, a professor and autism researcher at Arizona State University. He had seen the connection fist hand when his daughter was diagnosed with ASD. “The question is, is this because of the pain and discomfort of the GI problems, or is it more than that?”

When Adams dug into the scientific literature, he found that dysbiosis, or a disruption of the normal ecosystem of bacteria and other organisms in the gut, can influence both ASD and GI symptoms. Treatment with vancomycin, a powerful antibiotic that is not absorbed in the bloodstream but stays in the gut, could bring temporary relief. But an antibiotic can only be used for a short period of time before bacteria begin to develop resistance to it. . . .

As with any new approach to treating a medical condition, initial success raises more questions than it answers. Will the approach benefit a broader group of ASD patients, including those who do not suffer significant GI distress? Is vancomycin needed to knock down the existing microbial ecosystem prior to an influx of healthy gut bacteria? What is the best duration of the treatment? It will take time and multiple studies to answer these questions, but Adams is optimistic that a licensed microbial treatment for ASD will become available in a few years.

In the meantime, the ASU team is preparing another trial for children. Their collaborators have developed a pill form of the microbial transplant that they believe will bypass the issue of stomach acid and deliver a more consistent product to the gut. The pill is already being used in other studies, and Adams believes the change will deliver more consistent results than their first trial.

Read more: https://www.smithsonianmag.com/scie...l-treat-autism-180972416/#X4Ls206jfZWdhu0X.99