"Intense exercise could trigger ALS in those with genetic risk" … I swear, some days are just beyond infuriating and bordering on depressing …

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Second star to the right ...
Intense exercise could trigger ALS in those with genetic risk … I swear, some days are just too depressing …
https://www.livescience.com/exercise-triggers-als.html?utm_source=notification

It’s an hypothesis still in an investigatory stage, but even so, it’s acceptable to consider the possibility that strenuous exercise can cause ALS under the right genetic circumstances, while at the same time, it’s also OK to categorically state the GET is good, even healing, for people dealing with ME? With or without potential genetic markers or SNPS?

Really?

This is such an abrogation of logic that I swear, I do despair …. mostly because the ironic illogic of the juxtapositioning of the two appears to totally escape the notice of the medical establishments here, there, and probably everywhere ....

Just flucking shoot me … shoot me now. While I'm in the mood ....

EDIT .... usual typos and creation of entirely new, meaningless words ... like genetic 'arers', now corrected to something recognizable as an actual, you know, word ....
 
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I know some categories of health advisors who don't view "strenuous" exercise as all that positive, but they aren't western med.

strenuous really amps up metabolic waste products the body must deal with.
I was told this by my brother-in-law, the chemist, when I was cycling hundreds of miles weekly. He said it exercise causes oxidation.

I won't be doing any strenuous exercise anymore, so I'm not feeling too worried about ALS.:)
Yikes, though, It would be worse than ME. My friend has PLS, like ALS, but slower progressing. All he can do is move one arm.
 

Mouse girl

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Yeah, I think it's pretty common knowledge for alot of docs to know that being an athlete may not be the healthiest thing. And yes, I've heard that athletic levels of exercise, those who take it so far and hurt there health and bring on genetic vulnerabilities. Just like me pushing myself because I needed to, wasn't good for my CFS genetics. But, than again, other things i did like eat health good foods when I was young and some good exercise, yoga and "stuff" may have helped me body in other ways. Who knows!

I know orthos love runners, they keep them in business! I think the ideas of extremes or being "the best" are unhealthy. But, those are ideas very deeply embedded in American culture.
 

Boba

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I could swear that the gym was part of my onset...
Open window effect could explain the role of the gym:

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/20839496/

The 'open window' theory is characterised by
short term suppression of the immune system following an acute bout of endurance exercise
. This window of opportunity may allow for an increase in susceptibility to upper respiratory illness (URI)
.
 
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I know orthos love runners, they keep them in business! I think the ideas of extremes or being "the best" are unhealthy.
slightly related- my husband was in the ER when they were evaluating a guy who had wrecked his mtn bike.

this guy was being ex rayed and it seems was covered in past injuries, broken bones etc.