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Increased densities of T and B lymphocytes indicate neuroinflammation in subgroups of schizophrenia and mood disorder patients

pattismith

Senior Member
Messages
3,946
Brain, Behavior, and Immunity
Volume 88, August 2020, Pages 497-506

Increased densities of T and B lymphocytes indicate neuroinflammation in subgroups of schizophrenia and mood disorder patients

panelKonstantinSchlaaffabHenrikDobrowolnyabThomasFrodlabcdChristianMawrinceTomaszGosabfJohannSteinerabc1BernhardBogertsacg1

https://doi.org/10.1016/j.bbi.2020.04.021Get rights and content

Highlights


Elevated T and B lymphocytes are found in 1/3 of schizophrenia and depression brains.

This observation may indicate blood-brain barrier dysfunction (more permeable state).

Digital image and data clustering analyses are suitable to detect this subgroup.

Abstract

An increasing number of clinical, epidemiological and genetic studies as well as investigations of CSF and blood suggests that neuroinflammation plays an essential role in the etiology of schizophrenia and mood disorders.

However, direct neuropathological evidence of inflammation within the brain tissue remains sparse and the regional distribution of lymphocytes as surrogate markers of blood-brain barrier (BBB) impairment has not yet been investigated in this context.


Densities of T and B lymphocytes were assessed in coronal whole brain sections of 22 patients with schizophrenia and 20 patients suffering from major depression or bipolar disorder, compared to 20 individuals without neuropsychiatric disorders from the Magdeburg Brain Collection. Cell densities were determined by immunohistochemical staining (anti-CD3 for T cells, anti-CD20 for B cells), followed by automated microscopic image acquisition and analysis. Hierarchical clustering and detailed cluster analysis were performed to detect possible subgroups of patients.

Regional distribution was assessed by analysis of color coded mappings based on microsopic scans.


Elevated lymphocyte density was found in 7 out of 20 mood disorder patients (adj. p = 0.022; Fisher’s exact test, FET), 9 out of 22 schizophrenic patients (adj. p = 0.014; FET) and in 1 of 20 controls (p < 0.005; FET).

Several cases showed different patterns of infiltration affecting cortical regions or subcortical white matter, while some presented diffuse infiltration.

In two thirds of patients, no increased lymphocyte density could be found.

The current findings indicate that lymphocyte infiltration occurs in a greater proportion of schizophrenia and mood disorder patients as compared to healthy controls.

Under healthy conditions lymphocytes rarely cross the BBB.

Thus, higher densities are considered indicators of neuroinflammation associated with an impairment of the BBB.
 

Pyrrhus

Senior Member
Messages
4,172
Location
U.S., Earth
Sigh. Yet another paper that misuses the term "neuroinflammation".

It's a very interesting paper, but they are talking about neurological inflammation, which is NOT the same as the 2004 definition of "neuroinflammation".

The 2004 definition of "neuroinflammation" has nothing to do with infiltrating lymphocytes or the blood-brain barrier (BBB). It's sad that so many people confuse the term "neuroinflammation" with "neurological inflammation". "Neurological inflammation" typically implies classical (Greco-Roman) inflammation, not neuroinflammation.

Maybe, back in 2004, they should have called neuroinflammation "tissue-resident inflammation" or "microinflammation". Then there might have been less confusion. Oh well.
 

Pyrrhus

Senior Member
Messages
4,172
Location
U.S., Earth
Yes, I recently did an informal survey of papers from the last year and almost half of the papers that used "neuroinflammation" in the title were actually talking about neurological inflammation, not about neuroinflammation. It seems that they were using "neuroinflammation" as a buzzword, not as a clearly-defined scientific concept.

Oh well. My father, who studied the evolution of language, taught me that "today's language mistakes often become tomorrow's language rules".
 

uglevod

Senior Member
Messages
220
Hell yes!

But since up to half of the world population is chronically infected with parasite infections, like, for example, toxoplasma(see wikipedia) and there are ton of links binding toxo with mental diseases / mental illness and the fact that T cells(CD4 + CD8) are needed to clear the infection ..

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2843452/

.. the study is not surprising