HTLV-1 / XMRV Conference starts today!

Jemal

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Hi eric_s, KDM is cooperating with a number of doctors. For example he is cooperating with Dr Lewis in Melbourne, Australia. In turn, Dr Lewis is training two new doctors. I suspect the WPI is also intending to train docs. Things are happening, just slowly and maybe sporadically. Bye, Alex
That's indeed music to my ears.
 

Spring

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Originally Posted by eric_s
I agree. I wonder why these doctors like him don't train others and expand. They should start a clinic than can see more people. In any other sector this is what would happen, why do these mechanisms seem not to work here?
Hi eric_s, KDM is cooperating with a number of doctors. For example he is cooperating with Dr Lewis in Melbourne, Australia. In turn, Dr Lewis is training two new doctors. I suspect the WPI is also intending to train docs. Things are happening, just slowly and maybe sporadically. Bye, Alex
KDM is also training doctors in Norwegen.
 

eric_s

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Hi eric_s, KDM is cooperating with a number of doctors. For example he is cooperating with Dr Lewis in Melbourne, Australia. In turn, Dr Lewis is training two new doctors. I suspect the WPI is also intending to train docs. Things are happening, just slowly and maybe sporadically. Bye, Alex
Yes, good news, thanks. I know the WPI wants to do that, but i've never heard it from others before.
 

boomer

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htlv

I thought that every time someone donates blood they check it for htlv-1? So I would have thought that they would know what percentage of the population carry it. I think I recall reading about a small study that found that half of people with thyroid autoimmune disease carried htlv-1 or 2.
 

WillowJ

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Hi WillowJ, I think you are right about this, but the antibody data is all suspect. Many XMRV proteins are homologous to many human proteins, and that is what antiXMRV antibodies target. I don't know if any of the antibodies are specific for highly non-homologous regions of XMRV. If they are, that would be something.

Bye
Alex
right; we seem to be finding, at least with some serology tests, something that's not necessarily XMRV, but in this particular test, the other thing they identified, is another retrovirus (and HTLV causes blood cancer, something that is relevant to our disease population, if properly defined). Regardless of whether the positive serology indicates MLVs in particular, this result could tell us some interesting things about our disease population, particularly if we could get some more specific tests. It seems specificity can be either done or not done, because the Groom study said out of their positive by serology groups (supposedly mostly controls), I think 4 of those were specific for XMRV (the rest were not, and could have been for cross-reactives).
 

WillowJ

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The problem I have with KDM is that he never seems to publish anything.
??? http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed?term="De Meirleir K"[Author] "chronic fatigue syndrome"

now granted, I'm not 100% happy with each of these studies, but the claim that KDM does not publish is astonishing, and incorrect.

Maybe you were thinking of Cheney, who doesn't publish any more (only twice since 1995, and never since 1997).
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed?term="Cheney"[Author] "chronic fatigue syndrome"
 

Jemal

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??? http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed?term="De Meirleir K"[Author] "chronic fatigue syndrome"

now granted, I'm not 100% happy with each of these studies, but the claim that KDM does not publish is astonishing, and incorrect.
I stand corrected WillowJ, sorry. And thanks for taking the time for posting this. I edited my original post and added a sentence that he does publish.

I guess I would like to see publications from him on XMRV (but maybe he tried and was blocked).
 

ukxmrv

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Alex, I couldn't get that link to work so I had a hunt through the oncotarget journal and found this paper

Xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus (XMRV) in prostate cancer cells likely represents a laboratory artifact

so I created a Tinyurl to that paper.

http://tinyurl.com/5u34vzj

Not sure if that is the one you were referring to?
 

Jemal

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Alex, I couldn't get that link to work so I had a hunt through the oncotarget journal and found this paper

Xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus (XMRV) in prostate cancer cells likely represents a laboratory artifact

so I created a Tinyurl to that paper.

http://tinyurl.com/5u34vzj

Not sure if that is the one you were referring to?
You are talking about the same paper. I made a thread about it yesterday by the way:
http://forums.phoenixrising.me/show...-cells-likely-represents-a-laboratory-artifac
 

Bob

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For my own convenience, I've made a full list of all the XMRV related abstracts from the conference, with links, and with names of the authors, on a separate wiki page.
Here it is, in case it's helpful for anyone else:
http://forums.phoenixrising.me/show...Retrovirology+-+List+of+Abstracts&redirect=no

Thanks very much to everyone who has already compiled lists...
I made the new list because I needed to see the authors listed with the abstract title.
 

Overstressed

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Hi all,

I had an email-chat last week with one of the organiser/researcher, and asked if 'XMRV was here to stay ?', and the answer was:

"XMRV is a FACT, it's a new human retrovirus. Currently, there's no proof it causes CVS nor prostate cancer. Earlier associations could not be replicated with other, independent research. During the congress there was more talk about contamination and cross-reaction as an explanation for the earlier found associations with CFS and prostate cancer. Currently, there are a number of tests pending to see to what extent the original centers can identify XMRV, in positive and negative samples.

Until now, it looks like these centers suffer from contamination and cross-reaction.

Another question was if low genetic variation as seen with XMRV was possible ? The answer was: I was right, slow replication is not a counter-argument. In other words, it's possible that XMRV mutates slowly.

OS.
 

Francelle

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My interest was piqued by the presentation "Infection with Human T Lymphotropic Virus 1 is associated with bronchiectasis among Indigenous Australians" by Lloyd Einsiedel. Is there an abstract for this paper?

Although I do not know either my HTLV (nor my XMRV contaminated - lol) status, I do have the relatively uncommon condition of Bronchiectasis. This was diagnosed two years ago, which was, just about two years after the start of my M.E. symptoms and my chronic Mycoplasma Pn. infection.

One does wonder how some of these things interlink!
 

Jemal

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Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) is the leading cause of bronchiectasis, especially in children.
At least according to Wikipedia. It seems the other retrovirus is the main culprit for this illness.
Do you know your HIV status?

Anyway, at first I thought HTLV was associated with "only" 1 or 2 illnesses. It seems that virus can create a lot more trouble than is widely recognized. I read another study that found that 35% of the HTLV patients looked at had fibromyalgia.
 

Jemal

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Hi all,

I had an email-chat last week with one of the organiser/researcher, and asked if 'XMRV was here to stay ?', and the answer was:

"XMRV is a FACT, it's a new human retrovirus. Currently, there's no proof it causes CVS nor prostate cancer. Earlier associations could not be replicated with other, independent research. During the congress there was more talk about contamination and cross-reaction as an explanation for the earlier found associations with CFS and prostate cancer. Currently, there are a number of tests pending to see to what extent the original centers can identify XMRV, in positive and negative samples.

Until now, it looks like these centers suffer from contamination and cross-reaction.

Another question was if low genetic variation as seen with XMRV was possible ? The answer was: I was right, slow replication is not a counter-argument. In other words, it's possible that XMRV mutates slowly.

OS.
Thanks for the followup OS!
 

justy

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My interest was piqued by the presentation "Infection with Human T Lymphotropic Virus 1 is associated with bronchiectasis among Indigenous Australians" by Lloyd Einsiedel. Is there an abstract for this paper?

Although I do not know either my HTLV (nor my XMRV contaminated - lol) status, I do have the relatively uncommon condition of Bronchiectasis. This was diagnosed two years ago, which was, just about two years after the start of my M.E. symptoms and my chronic Mycoplasma Pn. infection.

One does wonder how some of these things interlink!
Hi Francelle, i have a fibrotic band in my lung (scar tissue) and now My M.E doctor thinks i do have bronchiectasis too, mine flares up and down if i have a cold or something, back on antibiotics right now.