How to avoid being asleep on the job

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How to avoid being asleep on the job

(if: I tend to agree with V9977's comments - the way that the reference to ME/CFS is placed in here is not well done - it's difficult to distinguish it from the rest of the article on tiredness)

So one in three of us visits a GP complaining of constant tiredness. Rob Sharp finds out what's wearing us out and how we can regain our get-up-and-go
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There are few who've avoided mainlining stimulants ahead of an exam but sustained tiredness in its most extreme forms can truncate lifespans. According to British charity Action for ME, an estimated 240,000 Britons have been diagnosed with the most severe form of fatigue chronic fatigue syndrome, or myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME). Its symptoms include debilitating fatigue, muscle pain, and mental fogginess. Lethargy caused by our lifestyles, on the other hand, can cause anxiety, depression and affect our ability to think clearly and react normally. Your average GP who reports that one in three of their patients say they're tired all the time, and often don't have the time to treat it recommends some digging. If there's no clear cause, there are some ways we can galvanise our lackadaisical frames into motion.
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Insulting
[info]v9977 wrote:
Tuesday, 9 March 2010 at 02:39 pm (UTC)
It is wrong to mention ME/CFS in an article about tiredness, it is a neurological condition. Fatigue is only a symptom of the disease. If you choose to include this, you should also mention the fatigue associated with MS, Cancer, etc.
Would you mention Alzheimer's when discussing forgetfulness? What if we then renamed it Chronic Forgetfulness.