Faecal capsules 'may help stop gut infection'

barbc56

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I think this point is also important. Interesting article. Thanks.

But while we are striving to make this treatment more accessible to patients it is important to remind people of the potential dangers of attempting 'home brew' faecal microbiota transplant using faecal material from family members or friends.

"This procedure should only be performed under strict medical supervision with material from thoroughly screened donors."
Barb
 

fibrodude84

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It's very effective when done in a clinical setting for C-diff. It's not been shown effective for gut diseases yet but it's interesting.
 

osisposis

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It's very effective when done in a clinical setting for C-diff. It's not been shown effective for gut diseases yet but it's interesting.

personally I think it may go a long ways in restoring PH and gut homeostatis, if you were made ill by ingestion alone, it may even help with BBB leakage, ?? and brain responces due to that, I dont about BBB breakdown. however environmental exposures can affect through inhalation, ingestion and absorbtion/skin, in WDB exposures all 3 ways are factors and BBB breakdown can also be had by way of sinus/brain routes, lung/brain, so thats different so it may have limited effects. so worth a try I think, as far as getting it down, it's not like we aint been eating S### for a long time already if ya know what I mean !!
 

osisposis

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How Microbes Defend and Define Us

In 2008, Dr. Khoruts, a gastroenterologist at the University of Minnesota, took on a patient suffering from a vicious gut infection of Clostridium difficile. She was crippled by constant diarrhea, which had left her in a wheelchair wearing diapers.

Dr. Khoruts decided his patient needed a transplant. But he didn’t give her a piece of someone else’s intestines, or a stomach, or any other organ. Instead, he gave her some of her husband’s bacteria.


In order to co-exist with our microbiome, our immune system has to be able to tolerate thousands of harmless species, while attacking pathogens. Scientists are finding that the microbiome itself guides the immune system to the proper balance.

One way the immune system fights pathogens is with inflammation. Too much inflammation can be harmful, so we have immune cells that produce inflammation-reducing signals. Last month, Sarkis Mazmanian and June L. Round at Caltech reported that mice reared without a microbiome can’t produce an inflammation-reducing molecule called IL-10.

The scientists then inoculated the mice with a single species of gut bacteria, known as Bacteroides fragilis. Once the bacteria began to breed in the guts of the mice, they produced a signal that was taken up by certain immune cells. In response to the signal, the cells developed the ability to produce IL-10.
http://www.nytimes.com/2010/07/13/science/13micro.html?pagewanted=all&_r=0