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Exogenous Ketones

paolo

Senior Member
Messages
198
Location
Italy
Has any of you ever tried exogenous ketones as a supplement? I have found low level of ketones (both acetoacetate and 3-hydroxybutyrate) in urines from three patients (I am one of them).

If cells (including brain cells) can't burn glucose properly (as the last study by Fluge & co. has suggested) then ketones could represent a valuable source of energy, expecially for the brain, which can't oxidise fatty acids.

I have seen that Maureen Hanson measured acetoacetate in blood in her study (row data here) and that there is a slight increase in the level of this metabolite in patients compared to controls which is not statistically significant (diagram below).

Could there be an increase in use of ketones in ME/CFS patients with a consequent low urinary excretion? Might ketones be useful as a therapy?

upload_2017-7-28_18-3-17.png
 
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cb2

Senior Member
Messages
384
Would you have to be following a ketogenic diet for the exogenous keytone to work?
Thanks
 

paolo

Senior Member
Messages
198
Location
Italy
Would you have to be following a ketogenic diet for the exogenous keytone to work?
Thanks

No, you have just to eat them, with no changes in your diet. This is the idea. A ketogenic diet induces the production of ketones by the liver, but you can also eat them. You can read this study on the use of ketones as a supplement.
 
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Basilico

Florida
Messages
948
My husband wrote a huge post on his experiment with taking Ketones here:
http://forums.phoenixrising.me/inde...sed-activity-tolerance-and-reduced-pem.52639/

No, you have just to eat them, with no changes in your diet. This is the idea. A ketogenic diet induces the production of ketones by the liver, but you can also eat them. You can read this study on the use of ketones as a supplement.

He didn't write about this in his post (I'll send him a reminder to add it in a follow-up post) but he did find that there was a huge difference in how effective the Ketones were depending on his diet. They need to be taken with a high fat/no carb (keto) diet. Taking them with carbohydrates completely cancelled them out, so there was no benefit at all. He also found that they need to be taken on an empty stomach because taking them with a meal reduced efficacy (unclear why that would happen). The ketones also had the opposite effect on his blood glucose and insulin sensitivity as would be expected (which goes against everything we've read).
 
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godlovesatrier

Senior Member
Messages
2,505
Location
United Kingdom
Ales Frost on twitter is doing a remission study (crowd sourced) to see if she and another patient can induce spontaneous remission. If there initial protocol doesn't work they will use exogenous ketones to see if that helps (not sure why).

https://remissionbiome.org/ most of the times they are doing here tie in with the NIH recently published research.