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Exercise Challenge Reveals a “Remarkable Discordance” in the Brains of People with ME/CFS

Rufous McKinney

Senior Member
Messages
13,462
The issue is if you turn that message off when you are still sick, bad things will happen because the Rest you fool! message is there for a reason.

exactly....its not "just a message". You will in fact do damage by ignoring the message.

A good friend actually called me yesterday- we chatted for about an hour, her doing most of the chatting

totally suddenly, I shifted energetically and what I call Zombie Coma set in. It became impossible to continue the call and this Zombie state continued for about three hours.

What happened there? Why do we never: figure that out?
 

Husband of

Senior Member
Messages
318
Yes, this is partly how sickness works.

The issue is if you turn that message off when you are still sick, bad things will happen because the Rest you fool! message is there for a reason.
Although sometimes, as with septic shock, the immune system response can make us more ill than the pathogen. So it’s pretty hard to know how to go about treatment.
 

vision blue

Senior Member
Messages
1,892
Based just on the abstract as haven't read the study yet (thanks also to @Pyrrhus for posting the title abstract and link), there may be a flaw in the study. While the excercise chosen for the study may have been "submaximal" exertion for normals, it may have not been submaximal exertion for CFSers. It's possible that if you took normals and gave them more excercise than they are accostomed to, that they too may have had an increase in activity in that same brain region as CFSers. Again, won't know till i read the paper if they avoided this pitfall, but if they did, it's not in the abstract.
 

Husband of

Senior Member
Messages
318
Based just on the abstract as haven't read the study yet (thanks also to @Pyrrhus for posting the title abstract and link), there may be a flaw in the study. While the excercise chosen for the study may have been "submaximal" exertion for normals, it may have not been submaximal exertion for CFSers. It's possible that if you took normals and gave them more excercise than they are accostomed to, that they too may have had an increase in activity in that same brain region as CFSers. Again, won't know till i read the paper if they avoided this pitfall, but if they did, it's not in the abstract.
Exactly, I was meaning to say exactly this. We may just be seeing the difference between “hey you have exerted too much, please rest” and “oh you need to exert yourself, let me help you”

wouldn’t mean it’s not a useful study though. It at least shows that with what normal people would consider minimal exertion, people with me/cfs have a much different response
 

vision blue

Senior Member
Messages
1,892
Exactly, I was meaning to say exactly this. We may just be seeing the difference between “hey you have exerted too much, please rest” and “oh you need to exert yourself, let me help you”

wouldn’t mean it’s not a useful study though. It at least shows that with what normal people would consider minimal exertion, people with me/cfs have a much different response

Would not show even that though. Just may show different response because they don't usually excercise at that level. (of course that's cause they can;t, but the study would not speak to that at all).
 
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