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Evidence-based medicine can have problems with the evidence

Learner1

Senior Member
Messages
6,305
Location
Pacific Northwest
This just hit the news. Its important to see all the data from research, and see data that's positive and negative, not just the data that makes the author's point.

https://www.sciencealert.com/how-much-top-journal-editors-get-paid-by-big-pharma-corrupt

More recently, it's become clear that the system for publishing results on evidence-based medicine is broken, too.

On paper, evidence-based medicine is a good thing. It's how we get life-saving treatments and medication, and it's the requirement for any new drugs to be based on solid, peer-reviewed research.

But this assumes that peer-reviewed research will be unbiased, and that's not always the case.

Just last week, a report concluded that many clinical trials are greenlit based on a shockingly poor evidence base, sometimes without any published data.

Now nephrologist Jason Fung has taken to Medium to highlight even more damning evidence against the journals we rely on to print the best academic research...
 

Learner1

Senior Member
Messages
6,305
Location
Pacific Northwest
Just to be clear, I posted the article not to discredit all research, but to recognize that we need to critically read what is presented to us, asking questions about whether it was a good study, whether the conclusions make sense, whether there are other questions that also need to be answered, and most importantly, whether we truly can compare ourselves to the patients in the study and assume we can obtain the same results.

I see so many people (including myself) quoting studies as if they are the definitive knowledge on a topic, when the reality is that "your mileage may vary" depending in genetics, environmental factors and health history.

It's challenging to extrapolate these study findings and decide if they are compelling enough to work for us.