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Enterovirus Discovery at Stanford--Will a Treatment Follow?

Hip

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Do you know which Pharma? I'd like to follow them.
There appears to be no publicly available information about this at present.

Some time back, Dr Chia mentioned that a pharmaceutical company bought the two anti-coxsackievirus B drugs from the Rega Institute, the research institute in Belgium who created them. Those drugs are codenamed Rega Compound 17 & Rega Compound A, and are detailed in this post.

I believe the reason these drugs are due to come out relatively quickly is because the FDA have said that any drug which treats ME/CFS can be fast tracked. The FDA drug fast track program speeds up the approval process for drugs. Because these drugs may treat ME/CFS, they have been awarded fast track status.
 
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@Hip I have read suggestions that "provoking" a virus while treating can help clear it from the system (in its acute form?). Would this theory in any way transfer to enteroviruses in their non-cytolytic state?
It was on this forum I read that, I believe. Any information on treatment of enteroviruses is hazy at best. It seems the world of medicine is still ignorant where these critters are concerned!
 

Pyrrhus

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@Hip I have read suggestions that "provoking" a virus while treating can help clear it from the system (in its acute form?). Would this theory in any way transfer to enteroviruses in their non-cytolytic state?
It was on this forum I read that, I believe. Any information on treatment of enteroviruses is hazy at best. It seems the world of medicine is still ignorant where these critters are concerned!
I think you would first have to clarify what you mean by "provoking". There is much talk these days of "provoking" latent HIV to come out of its latent state, while treating with antivirals, in order to allow the immune system to destroy the infected cells. This is still experimental. There has also been similar talk in the past regarding herpesviruses.

However, this approach will not work if the immune system is unable to destroy the infected cell, as would be the case with infected neurons, where enteroviruses are likely to persist.

I hope this helps.
 

Hip

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@Hip I have read suggestions that "provoking" a virus while treating can help clear it from the system (in its acute form?). Would this theory in any way transfer to enteroviruses in their non-cytolytic state?
I think what you mean by "provoking" a virus is waking the virus from its latent (dormant) state within cells. This is indeed a way that theoretically you might clear a virus.

For example, the reason that a cold sore around the mouth never disappears is because the herpes simplex virus, as it reawakens to create the cold sore, is slowly cleared by the immune system; but a small percentage of this virus goes off to hide within cells, and stays in those cells in a latent state.

Because the virus is quiet during latency, immune system does not notice those cells, so the virus lives on to fight another day. But if you could reawaken all herpes simplex viruses from their latent state in cells, then the immune system would spot those infected cells, and you could clear all the virus from your body, and your cold sore would never come back.

So far though, I don't think anyone has been able to coax herpes simplex out of latency, because it they had, we would have a permanent cure for herpes cold sores.

And this approach will only work for viruses that are capable of entering a latent state, such the herpesvirus family.

Enterovirus is not capable of latency, although it does enter into a latency-like state called a non-cytolytic infection, when again it hides inside cells. Non-cytolytic is not fully dormant, but smolders away as a low-level infection in the cell, which tends not to be noticed by the immune system, and/or is not able to be cleared by the immune system.

If you could coax non-cytolytic enterovirus into returning back to a normal full infection, then you may well be able to clear the enterovirus infection from the body. In ME/CFS, it is the non-cytolytic form of enterovirus that is assumed to cause all the trouble.

We actually know the cellular conditions that cause enterovirus to change from a full infection to a low-level non-cytolytic infection. In short, non-cytolytic enterovirus can only arise in non-dividing cells; these cells lack an important factor called hnRNP C in their cytoplasm (full technical details here). It is the lack of hnRNP C in the cell that allows non-cytolytic enterovirus to form. If we could change those cellular conditions, then we might be able to eliminate enterovirus.
 
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I’m curious. What are you basing this on? Last time I spoke with John Chia, he said that the drugs had not started human testing, but Chia predicted that the drugs might enter phase 1 human testing in “a year or two”. As you probably know, roughly 90% of drugs that enter phase 1 never make it to market.
Phase 1 would be animal testing to figure out dosage and how much is too much. I believe this is already completed.
Phase 2 is Human testing on a small scale.
Phase 3 would be Human testing on a large scale.