Dr Weir’s supplement protocol

BrightCandle

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My Long hauling friend takes this protocol and it does work for them, all be it at a Niacin dose of 100mg. They avoid the flush by eating Apples with the drugs, that slows the release of the drug a bit and avoids the pain and suffering. 3 weeks.... its no cure its an ongoing treatment you need forever. I think my friend has been on it 6months or so.

Does nothing for me.
 

Learner1

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Has anyone else done Dr Weir’s protocol for ME/long covid? I’m intrigued if it’s helped anyone?
View attachment 46745
I agree with @JES - those doses are low, and it's a very minimal protocol. I take:

3g vitamin C in 3 1g doses
10,000IU Vitamin D plus 200mcg K2
3 Thorne BioMins
60mg Thorne zinc picolinate
1g quercetin
150mg NMN

Plus:

Vitamins A, B1, B2, B5, B6, B7, B9, B12, E
ALA, glutathione, melatonin, resveratrol, berberine, sulforophane, Huperzine A
T3, T4 and a few other pharmaceuticals
 
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Second star to the right ...
I agree with @JES - those doses are low, and it's a very minimal protocol.
I agree.


Dr. Weir is extremely conservative, you might say cautious, in anything he expresses. This protocol could be a simple daily regimen for someone who just wants to improve their nutrition profile ....

EDITc.... for bad syntax and a typo. Or two.
 
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There are a lot of very decent people who are not doing all they can to help us.;)
None of us can comfortably, or even effectively, work beyond our abilities, limitations, or guiding principles.

In Dr. Weir's case, his guiding principle has always been do the least damage to the patient, which means taking a very cautious, careful, approach. Not necessarily the best posture, but hardly the worst.

In the case of most of the other Drs those of us on PR have endur ....uh, encountered, the explanation lies more in the realm of 'abilities', 'empathy', 'practical curiosity', and willingness to put some effort into the exercise of their professional obligations to, and responsibility for, their patients.

Very sad. But so is much of life. Bugger :grumpy::grumpy::grumpy::grumpy:.
 

livinglighter

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Unfortunately, the protocol didn't do anything for me, but I couldn't last the three months recommended as I struggle with taking meds properly (on time, consistently, etc.) He does recommend pharmaceutical drugs if the protocol doesn't work.

Dr Bansal said the same - although his supplement management plan is much more extensive.

There are a lot of very decent people who are not doing all they can to help us.;)
I guess it may come down to what the patient can afford. Many of us relied on the NHS, so we are unlikely to afford extensive testing, which leads to the most help when we approach him. What he does do is inform GPs about further testing patients can have carried out on the NHS. For those with good health insurance plans, he probably recommends a whole range of things to help.

Personally, I'd say he is the best person to turn to for disability support in the UK. He is probably the only Dr in the UK that will help in that capacity. He is also medico-legal, so can help people challenge unfair employment/insurance, etc., cases.
 
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mermaid

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I have seen Dr Weir recently (Dec) I did write him a history as I have had ME for around 20 years and during that time have already tried things, seen other 'experts' and also take a load of previously recommended supplements that I listed. Maybe for that reason he didn't put me on the protocol as above.

He did recommend that I tried the Flushing Niacin though, just every 2 days and curiously he did not mention the quercetin to take with it - is supposed to reduce the burning or what? I have tried it in the past for what I believed to be histamine issues, but I don't take it ongoing and it wasn't on the list of my supplements.

Also my understanding re the Flushing Niacin is that it's important to flush, and that is why he is telling you to take the flushing kind. I already take Niacin (non flushing kind) in a B complex so this is an extra. However he suggested that I take it in the middle of the day and not in the evening as is written here - I wonder why? The first time I took it in the middle of the day and had no flushing at all (presumably due to whatever I had just eaten - not apple as I don't eat them much).

The second time I had forgotten to take it in the day, so I thought, why not take it at bedtime instead (it was mentioned online to be Ok to do this)? The flush was so horrendous that I went into an anxiety state over it, and there was no way I could just lie there calmly and had to get up and try to hold it together for an hour until it had passed. Never again.......!!!! I live alone and wondered what I would do if it had got worse.
 

mermaid

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What's the purpose of taking the flushing niacin? Wonder if NAD+ it NMN might be better, along with P5P, which many are deficient in as over 100 processes use it and it'll convert to niacin as needed.
I think that the idea is that it MIGHT help with blood clots if indeed the research being done shows that they are a 'thing' in ME and Long Covid . My understanding is that the research is principally being done in the latter. I cannot recall exactly what Dr Weir said to me during the consultation on this subject. In my case I think he would have to be cautious (hence every other day treatment) due to already having below range platelets (only just though but with a history of thrombocytopenia in pregnancy.)
 

Learner1

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I think that the idea is that it MIGHT help with blood clots if indeed the research being done shows that they are a 'thing' in ME and Long Covid . My understanding is that the research is principally being done in the latter. I cannot recall exactly what Dr Weir said to me during the consultation on this subject. In my case I think he would have to be cautious (hence every other day treatment) due to already having below range platelets (only just though but with a history of thrombocytopenia in pregnancy.)
There are a lot of better things for hypercoagulation. NAD+ and NMN are more direct for helping energy.
 
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Thanks for posting the protocol. I was already taking everything and in much higher dosages except quercetin and the Niacin I was taking was non flushing. I added in quercetin and flushing niacin but am not having a flush!

Why am I not having a Niacin flush? Perhaps my stomach emptying is always too slow that it’s never empty (I have even tried first thing on a morning to no avail)? Perhaps I have absorption issues? Perhaps a different reason . . .

Should I up the dosage to 100mg flushing? I want to get a sweat on!

I am thinking it would be useful for detoxing mould/mold too?
 

Wishful

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Is it a sudden suicidal mood or a gradual on-set low mood that can lead to feeling suicidal?
It's been over a decade since I had that problem, so the details are a bit vague, but it was fairly drastic change from normal to strongly suicidal. I think it took a few hours to kick in. I believe the suicidal mood was due to excess quinolinic acid, and the extra niacin reduced the amount of endogenous QUIN being catalyzed into niacin.

There was one time when a B12 tablet also induced a strong suicidal mood. When I dared to test it again some months later, there was no problem.

The lesson is: if you suddenly feel like giving up on life, it might just be a reaction to something you ate/took.
 
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I have a feeling this isn’t the full protocol? Having had an appointment with Dr Weir recently there was more to it then this. Just an FYI.