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Dr. Cheney comments on a you-tube video about his poster at the XMRV Workshop

xrayspex

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heh heh you understood me, I'm a child of the 70s what can I say

oh but this is all secret betwixt us kids right? ooops, its a public forum, nevah mind, shoot me a pm latah guys ;)

plus I already donated 10k to him, god bless him but I think that should cover website viewing for life
 

leela

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Instead of being the genetically feeble ones, we may be the genetically stronger ones. :D

Maybe someday researchers will be begging to study us to find out how our bodies manage to fight the cancer-causing viruses. Wouldn't that be ironic after all these years of neglect. :tear:
Right on, SoC!
 

leela

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Should I Start a new Thread?

I'm wondering if I ought to contact his office directly, or ask a patient, or (ahem) heavy donator, to
pose the question to him as to whether he'd be amenable to a group subscription by We the Needy.
Perhaps it could become part of the Library, which is restricted access? Or perhaps as someone else suggested we could all get one password or what have you? Ought I to start a thread to see if there's enough interest to generate this inquiry to Dr C? What do y'all think?
 

curry

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If I'm following you, the idea is that HGRVs are likely to cause cancers, but that those of us with ME/CFS may have a genetic "benefit" that helps our bodies avoid (or reduce) the cancers by our adaptive response to the infection that others don't have. Unfortunately, this adaptive response is also debilitating.

It's a neat idea. Instead of being the genetically feeble ones, we may be the genetically stronger ones. :D

Maybe someday researchers will be begging to study us to find out how our bodies manage to fight the cancer-causing viruses. Wouldn't that be ironic after all these years of neglect. :tear:
This made me chuckle... thank you. :)

It is an interesting theory definitely - speaking about my family it even might fit.
All females I'm in the same bloodline related with (great-grandmother, grandmother, mother, sister, aunt) had cancer, I'm the only one who has been cancer free so far, but also the only with CFS.
 

xrayspex

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I wouldnt be surprised if we are in a way stronger, adapters, he who lives, albeit lamely, still wins
I also could always put on weight easily if not careful and my dad used to tell me when i was a kid that it meant I was stronger, that in a famine I would live longer than others as my body utilized calories wiser or somethin'.....hey maybe its all related, there is a fun book about this:

http://www.survivalofthesickestthebook.com/thebook.php

This revelatory book explains how, especially when you take the evolutionary long-view, many diseases are really complicated blessings, not simple curses. Survival of the Sickest answers the riddles behind many diseases that seem to be inexplicably wired into our genetic code, starting with the biggest riddle of them all: If natural selection is supposed to get rid of harmful genetic traits, why are hereditary diseases so common?

Through a fresh and engaging examination of our evolutionary history, Dr. Sharon Moalem reveals how many of the conditions that we think of as diseases today actually gave our ancestors a leg up in the survival sweepstakes. When the option is a long life with a disease or a short one without it, evolution opts for the long ball every time.
 

Sing

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Subscription to Dr. Cheney's Newsletter

leela,


I am with you in hoping that as a group we could get a subscription. What about starting a new thread? I am keenly interested in Cheney's thinking and approach. He is a bellwether type for the flock and I want to keep a close eye on him! Where he leads may just avoid a bad tumble all the way over the edge!
 

Sing

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xrayspex, I suspect that our disease is protective for cancer, frankly. I have noticed how it is people with strong systems who get cancer (more often). I am up in the age group where many succumb so I have had many points of comparison. Of course this isn't a scientific survey.

An example I read about of a protective illness is sickle cell anemia in West Africa. Those with it are not killed by malaria, which is so common there. I have also read recently something much less documented that people who have had malaria and recovered (at least temporarily) are less apt to succumb to HIV and AIDS.

Heck--maybe our slow brains which keep so many of us from driving, or driving much, or fast driving, at the most extreme end--that is bound to be protective of life and limb!

So, yeah! There is a big picture here. But still, of course, we want to feel better, and to be able to have fuller lives again, and I sure hope that we can get there!

Sing
 

xrayspex

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I would be up for Cheney newsletter, I still think the sly way might work better but I guess its hard to coordinate a conspiracy on line with peeps from all over the place haha

that book "survival of the sickest" does mention sickle cell and many other illnesses that I had no idea that put in a dif context totally made sense for survival like a couple hundred years ago, its a fascinating read
 
C

Cloud

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This revelatory book explains how, especially when you take the evolutionary long-view, many diseases are really complicated blessings, not simple curses. Survival of the Sickest answers the riddles behind many diseases that seem to be inexplicably wired into our genetic code, starting with the biggest riddle of them all: If natural selection is supposed to get rid of harmful genetic traits, why are hereditary diseases so common?


Thanks for the book link. It sounds like a very positive perspective on Evolution and Adaptation.

Looking only at the physical aspect of life....maybe the human gene pool would clear genetic defects and disease over time if we were the only living organisms here. But since we are not alone, our genetics are affected by other life wanting to survive as well. Maybe our increasing genetic disease is a sign that another life form has gained a few more rungs on the food chain ladder. Ultimately, life gives unto life to sustain life....and that includes humans.

I'm all in for the Cheney subscription, if he is willing to do that.