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DNA methyltransferase 1 mutation

aquariusgirl

Senior Member
Messages
1,732
@BeautifulDay

Hey, have you seen this paper or heard about these mutations?

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25815005

2 things show up as rare & pathogenic for me... IDUA (1 rare DNA variation)

This gene encodes an enzyme that hydrolyzes the terminal alpha-L-iduronic acid residues of two glycosaminoglycans, dermatan sulfate and heparan sulfate. This hydrolysis is required for the lysosomal degradation of these glycosaminoglycans. Mutations in this gene that result in enzymatic deficiency lead to the autosomal recessive disease mucopolysaccharidosis type I (MPS I).

ABCG8
21 DNA variations.. none rare and 4 protein coding

The protein encoded by this gene is a member of the superfamily of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters. ABC proteins transport various molecules across extra- and intra-cellular membranes. ABC genes are divided into seven distinct subfamilies (ABC1, MDR/TAP, MRP, ALD, OABP, GCN20, White). This protein is a member of the White subfamily. The protein encoded by this gene functions to exclude non-cholesterol sterol entry at the intestinal level, promote excretion of cholesterol and sterols into bile, and to facilitate transport of sterols back into the intestinal lumen. It is expressed in a tissue-specific manner in the liver, intestine, and gallbladder. This gene is tandemly arrayed on chromosome 2, in a head-to-head orientation with family member ABCG5. Mutations in this gene may contribute to sterol accumulation and atherosclerosis, and have been observed in patients with sitosterolemia.
 

BeautifulDay

Senior Member
Messages
372
@BeautifulDay

Hey, have you seen this paper or heard about these mutations?

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25815005

2 things show up as rare & pathogenic for me... IDUA (1 rare DNA variation)

This gene encodes an enzyme that hydrolyzes the terminal alpha-L-iduronic acid residues of two glycosaminoglycans, dermatan sulfate and heparan sulfate. This hydrolysis is required for the lysosomal degradation of these glycosaminoglycans. Mutations in this gene that result in enzymatic deficiency lead to the autosomal recessive disease mucopolysaccharidosis type I (MPS I).

ABCG8
21 DNA variations.. none rare and 4 protein coding

The protein encoded by this gene is a member of the superfamily of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters. ABC proteins transport various molecules across extra- and intra-cellular membranes. ABC genes are divided into seven distinct subfamilies (ABC1, MDR/TAP, MRP, ALD, OABP, GCN20, White). This protein is a member of the White subfamily. The protein encoded by this gene functions to exclude non-cholesterol sterol entry at the intestinal level, promote excretion of cholesterol and sterols into bile, and to facilitate transport of sterols back into the intestinal lumen. It is expressed in a tissue-specific manner in the liver, intestine, and gallbladder. This gene is tandemly arrayed on chromosome 2, in a head-to-head orientation with family member ABCG5. Mutations in this gene may contribute to sterol accumulation and atherosclerosis, and have been observed in patients with sitosterolemia.

Nobody in my database has any rare mutations on the IDUA or the ABCG8 genes. They also do not have any pathogenic mutations on those genes.

What is the snp (or if no snp, then the position) for those two variants that are rare and pathogenic?