Different causes of SIBO and high hydrogen?

Strawberry

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I've been on Rifaximin for a couple weeks now (more to go still) but I don't feel it is doing anything at all. So I am wondering if it possible that bacteria isn't the main cause? Could something else cause high hydrogen? I've recently found out that I have been eating (through ground contamination) arsenic and lead...

Just curious as the normal Rifaximin course is two weeks, and he put me on 4 because it apparently is that severe. But I would think if two weeks is normal, I'd have felt a bit of a difference by now.

I'd love to hear anyone's experiences on Rifaximin also...
 

junkcrap50

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Rifaximin needs to be combined with another antibiotic to be totally effective. Rifaxmin alone does not have as much success in treating SIBO.
 

ljimbo423

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I've been on Rifaximin for a couple weeks now (more to go still) but I don't feel it is doing anything at all. So I am wondering if it possible that bacteria isn't the main cause? Could something else cause high hydrogen? I've recently found out that I have been eating (through ground contamination) arsenic and lead...

Just curious as the normal Rifaximin course is two weeks, and he put me on 4 because it apparently is that severe. But I would think if two weeks is normal, I'd have felt a bit of a difference by now.

I'd love to hear anyone's experiences on Rifaximin also...
This is a link to SIBO.com, the treatment section. She talks about using antibiotics, diet and optimizing your Migrating Motor Complex, which helps to clear bacteria from your small intestine and other things too.

SIBO is very often extremely difficult to get rid of and to maintain remission from. In my experience and reading about it for years. You will likely need to use every tool you can, long term, to get rid of it and prevent it from returning.

SIBO is very often "chronic", so it needs to be treated long term, even after you first get rid of it or it will most likely come back.
 

Strawberry

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Rifaximin needs to be combined with another antibiotic to be totally effective. Rifaxmin alone does not have as much success in treating SIBO.
I'm on lovastatin also. I know... not antibiotic. But if you look at the link Jim also posted

  • Rifaximin may be used for all cases of SIBO. There are 3 excellent dose options currently reported.
  • Neomycin is effective for constipation cases and is used in addition to Rifaximin, as double Abx therapy. Metronidazole is an effective alternative to Neomycin, currently under study at Cedars-Sinai.
  • If alternating diarrhea is present with constipation, the use of Rifaximin alone has been suggested.
(bold mine) The third one definitely is my issue. Should I still be on a 2nd antibiotic? I'd think Dr Kaufman had a pretty good treatment down by now?

Another quote from above link...
Rifaximin Dose Options:
1) 1600 mg per day x 10 days- 70-85% success normalizing LBT, 82% success normalizing GBT (Scarpellini)
1650 mg per day x 14 days (Pimentel), 550 mg tid.
2) 1200 mg per day x 14 days- 87-91% success normalizing GBT, 90-94% symptom improvement (Lombardo)
3) 1200 mg per day x 10 days with 5 g per day Partially Hydrolyzed Guar Gum
-87% success normalizing GBT, 91% symptom improvement (Furnari)

Rifaximin is available in both 200 mg and 550 mg in the US. Tid study doses are given at 8 am, 2 pm, 8 pm.
My packet says 550 mg, so I'm taking 1650 mg per day for 30 days.

SIBO is very often extremely difficult to get rid of and to maintain remission from. In my experience and reading about it for years. You will likely need to use every tool you can, long term, to get rid of it and prevent it from returning.
I've heard that also, and wonder if something in my body is the cause that needs to be eliminated. Like the arsenic and lead in my soil. And ultimately, in my body...

Nothing about SIBO makes sense.
 

junkcrap50

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(bold mine) The third one definitely is my issue. Should I still be on a 2nd antibiotic? I'd think Dr Kaufman had a pretty good treatment down by now?
Ah, you're correct. I was wrong. I misremembered and was thinking of multiple antibiotics for constipated SIBO.
 

Pyrrhus

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It's an incredibly complicated disorder and even the experts are working a lot by trial and error. There is just so much more research that needs to be done to understand SIBO and therefore to treat it most effectively.
One reason that SIBO is so hard to get rid of, may perhaps be due to the fact that these treatments are not addressing the underlying cause of SIBO.

Many people feel that the cause of SIBO is slow gastrointestinal motility. Basically, the nerves that are supposed to stimulate the intestinal muscles to move food along the digestive tract are not providing enough stimulation to move food along fast enough. As food sits around in the small intestine, bacteria, archaea, and fungi can build up, just as food that sits out of the refrigerator for too long can become rotten.

For more information, see:
https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/25319735/
 

ljimbo423

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One reason that SIBO is so hard to get rid of, may perhaps be due to the fact that the underlying cause is not being addressed by these treatments.
I agree and thanks for the link. I think not addressing intestinal motility or the Migrating Motor Complex could be a big reason why I'm still battling SIBO, 3 years later.

Still more work to do!:) Thanks again!
 

junkcrap50

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