Dealing with Glymphatic Issues

Learner1

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If anyone has any clues about dealing with glymphatic issues, I would love to hear them.
Well, you can always try Dave Aspreys suggestions and see if they help ;)

https://daveasprey.com/what-is-glymphatic-system-brain-detox-sleep/

Cranial sacral therapy might also be worth a try. If I only read about it, I'd think it's quackery, However I had 12 sessions after a significant auto accident, and laying there quietly on the table during a treatment, there were sudden releases that dramatically improved my symptoms, so there's something to it. This explains a bit about it:

https://www.thebrainpossible.com/treatments/craniosacral-therapy
 

Violeta

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Well, you can always try Dave Aspreys suggestions and see if they help ;)

https://daveasprey.com/what-is-glymphatic-system-brain-detox-sleep/

Cranial sacral therapy might also be worth a try. If I only read about it, I'd think it's quackery, However I had 12 sessions after a significant auto accident, and laying there quietly on the table during a treatment, there were sudden releases that dramatically improved my symptoms, so there's something to it. This explains a bit about it:

https://www.thebrainpossible.com/treatments/craniosacral-therapy
I did see Dave Asprey's article, and one point I would like to discuss is his diet recommendation. I am just about to pivot off of LCHF because I am afraid it is making lymphatic issues worse, and I would think any lymphatic congestion would make glymphatic drainage worse. I will probably continue with using the MCT oil, though.

I appreciate his idea of activated charcoal, and am going to start that this evening.

Do you have any experience with his type of diet and issues related to lymphatics/glymphatics?

It seems as though addressing viral issues, gut microbiota, and inflammation is important, too. I wasn't thinking about it in that way until watching Mike's video, but it does make sense. I had been taking olive leaf for about a week and think it might have been making things worse, then realized I most likely have lymphatic blockage, and need to work on that first.

I have a very badly sprained ankle, twisted knee, and swelling developed that. It's kind of like a very obvious indicator for if I'm doing something helpful or the opposite.

It does seem that cranial work should be helpful. Van Elzakker said something related to that in the video, can't quote him, I only watched it once so far.
 
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Violeta

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Draining of fluid in glymphatic is driven by cerebral arterial pulsation.
Van Elzakker mentioned that in the video about glymphatics.
I imagine carotid artery blockage or hardening of the arteries would not be good for that.
Do you think dysautonomia conditions can be related to this condition?


These findings demonstrate that cerebral arterial pulsatility is a key driver of paravascular CSF influx into and through the brain parenchyma, and suggest that changes in arterial pulsatility may contribute to accumulation and deposition of toxic solutes, including amyloid β, in the aging brain.

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/24227727/
 
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Learner1

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I did see Dave Asprey's article, and one point I would like to discuss is his diet recommendation. I am just about to pivot off of LCHF because I am afraid it is making lymphatic issues worse, and I would think any lymphatic congestion would make glymphatic drainage worse. I will probably continue with using the MCT oil, though.

I appreciate his idea of activated charcoal, and am going to start that this evening.

Do you have any experience with his type of diet and issues related to lymphatics/glymphatics?
I have lymphedema from lymph node harvesting during my cancer surgery. I was lucky that I had it immediately, got educated, and have been able to manage it fairly well. Things that help:
  • Lymphatic massage
  • Keeping body weight normal/low
  • Exercise that causes rebounding to help pump fluid
  • Being vigilant with extra fluid being added
  • Staying out of saunas, hot tubs and warm baths
Ive been on a LCHF throughout and don't think that's a problem as long as one's digestive system can handle it, with proper gallbladder function and bacteria and the gut that can break fat down. Enzymes might help if that's a problem.

It seems as though addressing viral issues, gut microbiota, and inflammation is important, too
Absolutely
I have a very badly sprained ankle, twisted knee, and swelling developed that. It's kind of like a very obvious indicator for if I'm doing something helpful or the opposite.
Topically applied arnica gel or cream along with up to eight grams a day of a high quality curcumin should help to reduce the swelling.
I was wondering whether BBB permeability had anything to do with the periventricular space that was talked about in one of the videos and found this.

The relationship between blood-brain barrier permeability and enlarged perivascular spaces: a cross-sectional study

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/31190773/
interesting. I would suspect that working on the microbiome would reduce leaky gut and leaky BBB might help.
 

Violeta

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I have lymphedema from lymph node harvesting during my cancer surgery. I was lucky that I had it immediately, got educated, and have been able to manage it fairly well. Things that help:
  • Lymphatic massage
  • Keeping body weight normal/low
  • Exercise that causes rebounding to help pump fluid
  • Being vigilant with extra fluid being added
  • Staying out of saunas, hot tubs and warm baths
Ive been on a LCHF throughout and don't think that's a problem as long as one's digestive system can handle it, with proper gallbladder function and bacteria and the gut that can break fat down. Enzymes might help if that's a problem.

Absolutely
Topically applied arnica gel or cream along with up to eight grams a day of a high quality curcumin should help to reduce the swelling.
interesting. I would suspect that working on the microbiome would reduce leaky gut and leaky BBB might help.
Good advice, thank you. I had been applying arnica for the first week. It was improving. I don't know what happened that the swelling got so much worse and moved up my calf. I did a couple of things that may have caused it, not sure which thing that I did made it worse. So I wasn't sure if arnica would be the solution. But I'll start using it again. Thank you

Curcumin is a wondering thing but it bothers me. I am starting serrapeptase and bromelain, hoping they will calm things down. I acccidentally ran into information about manjistha for cleaning out the blood stream and lymphatics. I've taken a couple tablets, but it's not doing anything magic at the moment. I'm going to continue with it, though, because this is not the first time my leg has swollen so there must be some lymphatic congestion.

My sister has lymphedema due to removal of lymph nodes, too. It had been under control until this past summer, for no reason it popped up out of nowhere. So rebounders are okay for when it's caused by lymph node removal? I will have to tell her about that.

Yes, it seems working on the microbiome would be helpful.
 

Learner1

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Curcumin is a wondering thing but it bothers me. I am starting serrapeptase and bromelain, hoping they will calm things down.
Hmmm...what symptoms do you get from the curcumin and from what product? I use Designs for Health CurcumEvail, which is the highest quality product I've tested. Though I have run into someone allergic to it. Serrapeptase and bromelain might be useful but don't have the anti-inflammatory properties that curcumin does.
I'm going to continue with it, though, because this is not the first time my leg has swollen so there must be some lymphatic congestion.
Do follow-up. If tissue is swollen for long enough, it can become permanent and then it's a difficult problem to manage. I would seek out a physical therapist experienced with lymphatic issues.
My sister has lymphedema due to removal of lymph nodes, too. It had been under control until this past summer, for no reason it popped up out of nowhere. So rebounders are okay for when it's caused by lymph node removal? I will have to tell her about that.
My lymphedema Also tends to flare in warmer weather. Staying cool, and, if necessary, draping the affected area in cold wet towels can help. I also wear compression if it gets bad. As I mentioned, having an out of control for a period of time can lead to permanent stretching of the tissue, requiring compression garments for the rest of one's life, which is pretty undesirable,
 

Violeta

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Hmmm...what symptoms do you get from the curcumin and from what product? I use Designs for Health CurcumEvail, which is the highest quality product I've tested. Though I have run into someone allergic to it. Serrapeptase and bromelain might be useful but don't have the anti-inflammatory properties that curcumin does.
Do follow-up. If tissue is swollen for long enough, it can become permanent and then it's a difficult problem to manage. I would seek out a physical therapist experienced with lymphatic issues.
My lymphedema Also tends to flare in warmer weather. Staying cool, and, if necessary, draping the affected area in cold wet towels can help. I also wear compression if it gets bad. As I mentioned, having an out of control for a period of time can lead to permanent stretching of the tissue, requiring compression garments for the rest of one's life, which is pretty undesirable,
The curcumin I used is from Julia Chang @ sensiblehealth . com, it's a tincture. It was so long ago that I can't remember the specific symptoms. I did think at one point I found the reason that it bothered me, if I remember correctly, it's a Phase I liver detox agonist, and my Phase II is very slow.

At this point the most physical therapy I can do is self massage, and the best thing would probably be staying off my feet, because the tendons or ligaments are taking a long time to heal and at the core of the swelling. I had been using compression clothing for orthostatic hypotension since September, and have used it on and off on the ankle/leg, but I'm not sure if compression is correct in the case of trauma. Do you know?

I am wondering if the tendency to orthostatic hypotension makes one more likely to have swelling in cases of trauma. If so, I may have accidentally done something counterproductive. Bacopa monnieri improves hypoxia, and I had been taking for a while after the sprain, then realized it improves hypoxic condition by opening up arteries, which would be counterproductive in my case. I stopped it last week, have to get back to to just Butcher's Broom.

Heat of bed does make it worse for me, and at night leaving that swollen leg uncovered does relieve pain.

Thank you for all the advice. Would really appreciate your opinion on whether it's okay to use compression in case of healing from trauma.

I will try small dose of curcuma today, see how it goes.
 
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Learner1

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The curcumin I used is from Julia Chang @ sensiblehealth . com, it's a tincture. It was so long ago that I can't remember the specific symptoms. I did think at one point I found the reason that it bothered me, if I remember correctly, it's a Phase I liver detox agonist, and my Phase II is very slow.
Not being familiar with Julia or Sensible Health, I looked through her story and her site. While she seems very well meaning, I'm not convinced of the formulation of her curcumin product, whi h may contain high oxalate turmeric and contains two other botanicals, any of which may cause your reaction.

I'd try a standardized product like Meriva Longvida, etc before giving up, or CoreCurcumin by nurish.me or my favorite, the Designs for Health CurcumEvail.

Curcumin is a broad spectrum phase II detoxer in addition to being antiinflammatory and a COX2 inhibitor.

At this point the most physical therapy I can do is self massage, and the best thing would probably be staying off my feet, because the tendons or ligaments are taking a long time to heal and at the core of the swelling. I had been using compression clothing for orthostatic hypotension since September, and have used it on and off on the ankle/leg, but I'm not sure if compression is correct in the case of trauma. Do you know?
You might find this interesting, but I would definitely consult a physical therapist:

"Lower extremity compression garments use by athletes: why, how often, and perceived benefit | BMC Sports Science, Medicine and Rehabilitation | Full Text" https://bmcsportsscimedrehabil.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s13102-020-00230-8
I am wondering if the tendency to orthostatic hypotension makes one more likely to have swelling in cases of trauma. If so, I may have accidentally done something counterproductive. Bacopa monnieri improves hypoxia, and I had been taking for a while after the sprain, then realized it improves hypoxic condition by opening up arteries, which would be counterproductive in my case. I stopped it last week, have to get back to to just Butcher's Broom.
I couldn't find anything on orthostatic hypotension and swelling after trauma, But my guess would be it would be less not more.

Botanicals are not always benign. They do have useful medicinal properties, but definitely should be taken under the care of someone knowledgeable about their qualities especially when has multiple conditions to manage.
 

Violeta

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Not being familiar with Julia or Sensible Health, I looked through her story and her site. While she seems very well meaning, I'm not convinced of the formulation of her curcumin product, whi h may contain high oxalate turmeric and contains two other botanicals, any of which may cause your reaction.

I'd try a standardized product like Meriva Longvida, etc before giving up, or CoreCurcumin by nurish.me or my favorite, the Designs for Health CurcumEvail.

Curcumin is a broad spectrum phase II detoxer in addition to being antiinflammatory and a COX2 inhibitor.

You might find this interesting, but I would definitely consult a physical therapist:

"Lower extremity compression garments use by athletes: why, how often, and perceived benefit | BMC Sports Science, Medicine and Rehabilitation | Full Text" https://bmcsportsscimedrehabil.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s13102-020-00230-8
I couldn't find anything on orthostatic hypotension and swelling after trauma, But my guess would be it would be less not more.

Botanicals are not always benign. They do have useful medicinal properties, but definitely should be taken under the care of someone knowledgeable about their qualities especially when has multiple conditions to manage.
I think I found the reason Orthostatic hypotension might be related to lymphedema, whether it's caused by trauma or one of the other causes, is:
"α1-adrenergic and muscarinic agents enhance lymphatic contractility in vivo"
and α1-adrenergic receptors are the cause of my orthostatic hypotension.


With respect to the curcuma from sensiblehealth, tinctures are usually lower in oxalates, and bupleurum doesn't bother me, it's also in the Chinese Bitters. Let me check about the scutellaria.

I was glad I was wearing compression socks when I sprained my ankle, I am pretty sure it would have been worse. I am trying mild compression now while the ankle heals so that I don't cut off circulation.
 

Learner1

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think I found the reason Orthostatic hypotension might be related to lymphedema, whether it's caused by trauma or one of the other causes, is:
"α1-adrenergic and muscarinic agents enhance lymphatic contractility in vivo"
and α1-adrenergic receptors are the cause of my orthostatic hypotension
So, these agents increase lymphatic contractility? I would think that would cause improvement in lymphedema, not worsening. I have alpha A1 adrenergic antibodies and muscarinic m4 antibodies, for which I take a beta blocker and Huperzine A, And in the past, pyridostigmine, And have never noticed any correlation between my POTS and lymphedema, though in general, over time, my lymphedema has flared less. I did try an alpha blocker which looked good on paper but was a disaster - My pulse was 100 all the time on it...
With respect to the curcuma from sensiblehealth, tinctures are usually lower in oxalates, and bupleurum doesn't bother me, it's also in the Chinese Bitters. Let me check about the scutellaria.
Quite frankly, I don't think a tincture would do anything for me. But, I have learned over time by talking to various people in the industry that sourcing ingredients is a big challenge, and many well-meaning companies, unfortunately or inadvertently are using the wrong strain or contaminated ingredients that make the products ineffective or contaminated. Definitely we shouldn't use anything we are allergic to, but I do think that if we find there's one version of a product that is troublesome, it might be worth investigating another, particularly with something like curcumin which has many extremely beneficial properties.

Glad the mild compression is working.
 

Violeta

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So, these agents increase lymphatic contractility? I would think that would cause improvement in lymphedema, not worsening. I have alpha A1 adrenergic antibodies and muscarinic m4 antibodies, for which I take a beta blocker and Huperzine A, And in the past, pyridostigmine, And have never noticed any correlation between my POTS and lymphedema, though in general, over time, my lymphedema has flared less. I did try an alpha blocker which looked good on paper but was a disaster - My pulse was 100 all the time on it...
Quite frankly, I don't think a tincture would do anything for me. But, I have learned over time by talking to various people in the industry that sourcing ingredients is a big challenge, and many well-meaning companies, unfortunately or inadvertently are using the wrong strain or contaminated ingredients that make the products ineffective or contaminated. Definitely we shouldn't use anything we are allergic to, but I do think that if we find there's one version of a product that is troublesome, it might be worth investigating another, particularly with something like curcumin which has many extremely beneficial properties.

Glad the mild compression is working.
Yes, they increase contractility, and if you are deficient in the neurotransmitter that they require, you will have hypotension and also lymphatic fluid build up in the lower extremities. So the alpha 1 adrenergic agonists such as Butcher's Broom helps low blood pressure and poor lymphatic return.
 

Violeta

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Researching Effects of HSV-1 on Waste Clearance in the Brain

https://www.launch.umd.edu/project/2975

Herpes Simplex Virus-1 (HSV-1), is a prevalent viral agent infecting 50 to 80% of U.S. adults. This double-stranded DNA virus causes oral herpes, however, HSV-1 can travel from its initial oral infection to the Central Nervous System (CNS) where it remains in a dormant state and is occasionally reactivated. Due to its presence in the brain, the impacts of HSV-1 on the brain have been studied and have been found to correlate with a decrease in aquaporin-4 (AQP4) a protein in the astrocytic glial cells that regulates fluid through the brain to form the glymphatic system. This recently discovered waste clearance system in the brain flushes fluid in between blood vessels and eliminates natural waste, such as β-amyloid plaques, in the CNS.