Coxsackie A?

sometexan84

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@Hip need to extract some information from your noggin...

We always talk about Coxsackie B, but what about Coxsackie A?

I have abnormal results w/ high titers of Coxsackie A IgG, but have never researched "A" before.

My labcorp results...
1626990678049.png


LabCorp uses IFA for this test. Not sure how reliable this is, or what it means, or if maybe there's cross-reactivity w/ my active Coxsackie B infections?

This test was actually ordered by mistake... never thought to test this.

Any info you, or anyone, has on Coxsackie A?
 

Hip

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We always talk about Coxsackie B, but what about Coxsackie A?
I've never seen any studies showing that coxsackievirus A is involved with ME/CFS, or involved in any chronic disease of any sort. (If you can find any studies showing CVA is linked to chronic disease, I'd be very interested, but I have not been able to find any).

Whereas coxsackievirus B is linked to several chronic diseases, including ME/CFS, type 1 diabetes (chronic CVB infection of the insulin-producing cells), chronic myocarditis, dilated cardiomyopathy, Sjögren's syndrome, etc.


So for whatever reason, CVA does not seem to come up on the radar in the context of chronic disease. I do not know why; maybe it is because CVA does not form these persistent non-cytolytic infections as readily as CVB and echovirus do.
 

sometexan84

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I've never seen any studies showing that coxsackievirus A is involved with ME/CFS, or involved in any chronic disease of any sort. (If you can find any studies showing CVA is linked to chronic disease, I'd be very interested, but I have not been able to find any).

Whereas coxsackievirus B is linked to several chronic diseases, including ME/CFS, type 1 diabetes (chronic CVB infection of the insulin-producing cells), chronic myocarditis, dilated cardiomyopathy, Sjögren's syndrome, etc.


So for whatever reason, CVA does not seem to come up on the radar in the context of chronic disease. I do not know why; maybe it is because CVA does not form these persistent non-cytolytic infections as readily as CVB and echovirus do.
Well, in my case, I think Google thinks I just want to see Coxsackie B related material, making it slightly more difficult to actually Google what I am now looking for
 

Hip

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One interesting CVA serotype is coxsackievirus A9.

In the new enterovirus taxonomy, CVA9 is actually placed within the enterovirus B species, along with all the coxsackievirus Bs and echoviruses. We know that enterovirus B can form persistent non-cytolytic infections.

All the other CVAs are found either in enterovirus A, or enterovirus C.


So I wonder if CVA9 is similar to coxsackievirus B, and might form persistent non-cytolytic infections?
 

sometexan84

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Huh, how about that.

Some adults w/ dermatological manifestations (skin issues) from Coxsackie A6 had long-term symptoms at 2-yr follow up.

Looks like Coxsackie A can in fact become a low-level persistent infection (just that most no longer had it detectable in plasma at follow-up, but we know this is to be expected if following suit with CVB).

AND, a bunch of these cases had "CFS" and/or "persistent myalgia".

https://www.jaad.org/article/S0190-9622(18)32488-5/fulltext
"case 3 developed degenerative mitral valve disease and maintained low-level CV-A6 viremia, indicating that the virus had established low-level persistence in the host; cases 2, 8, and 10 developed persistent myalgia/arthralgia"
 

sometexan84

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That study is an interesting find. Table 1 indicates that 2 people out of 10 with CVA6 infection went on to develop ME/CFS.

Maybe this is something Dr Chia might be interested in.
Bizarre. I certainly was not expecting to see any mention of ME/CFS in the article. Wasn't searching for CFS at all.
 

Pyrrhus

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Enterovirus A71 evolved from Coxsackie A16 at some point between 1929-1952, so I would consider Coxsackie A16 to potentially be a serious persistent infection:

Evolutionary Genetics of Human Enterovirus 71: Origin, Population Dynamics, Natural Selection, and Seasonal Periodicity of the VP1 Gene
https://journals.asm.org/doi/full/10.1128/JVI.01019-09
 

Hip

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LabCorp uses IFA for this test.
I wonder why LabCorp uses IFA for its coxsackievirus A antibody test, but complement fixation (CF) for its coxsackievirus B antibody test?

I gather from Dr Chia's videos that CF is the least sensitive for chronic infection. I think the IFA and ELISA methods are a bit more sensitive, but not as sensitive as the gold standard neutralization method of detecting antibodies.


I notice also that the LabCorp CVA IFA antibody test comes in two varieties: IgM and IgG antibodies.

Whereas the LabCorp CVB CF antibody test does not specify whether it is IgM or IgG, which I think usually means that it detects both types of antibody at once, pooling both together (neutralization tests are usually like this also: they do not detect IgM or IgG individually, but pool both together).