Combination antidepressant treatments

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Hi, just wondering if any have had a good response from an antidepressant for cognitive / mood / energy levels and then lost that benefit then tried a myriad of monotherapy antidepressants and then ended up on a useful combination of antidepressants?
Is so which combo are you on?
Thanks!
Tom
 

Irat

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Hi, just wondering if any have had a good response from an antidepressant for cognitive / mood / energy levels and then lost that benefit then tried a myriad of monotherapy antidepressants and then ended up on a useful combination of antidepressants?
Is so which combo are you on?
Thanks!
Tom
A combo of antidepressants ? Ugh you might first want to inform yourselff what this can do to you. An antidepressant was what brought me here in the first place.wish I knew that before I ended up with drug induced neurotoxicity

https://www.survivingantidepressants.org/

https://www.madinamerica.com/2018/01/what-really-call-psychiatric-drugs/
 
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Yip it's true I don't think we know enough about long term effects of antidepressants however I think they can be helpful even life saving for some. I think why I've benefited is that the the pathophysiological process of my condition mimics that of anxiety / depression. Whether this is due to a neurotransmitter receptor or transport molecule antibody or faulty gene or what I know not. But there is undoubtedly not just the one disease process at play for all those labelled with CFS and even if there was individuals respond differently to the same stuff...
 
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I have been on a number of antidepressants since I got cfs 11 years ago. They helped with my anxiety but did nothing for my cfs.

Except Lexapro: when I was quitting Lexapro , the withdrawal caused a major crash that made me permanently worse. I'm currently on duloxetine and it's not doing anything for my cfs. But I'm worried again about what happens if I have to stop taking it. I think the withdrawals can cause serious crashes.
 

Judee

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I'm currently on duloxetine and it's not doing anything for my cfs. But I'm worried again about what happens if I have to stop taking it. I think the withdrawals can cause serious crashes.
I don't know if this would be of any help: https://www.peoplespharmacy.com/articles/how-to-stop-duloxetine-cymbalta-without-withdrawal-symptoms

They had a suggestion from a a board-certified family physician who specializes in pain and addiction who said,
“The best way to stop this drug is to put the patient on fluoxetine (Prozac) for one to two weeks. You then stop the Prozac. Prozac is so long lasting that it gradually decreases blood levels slowly enough so that the discontinuation syndrome doesn’t happen.
“This is simple and inexpensive. It is important, as you say in your article, that people do not stop this medication [duloxetine] on their own. However, it is not necessary to go through the ‘Chinese water torture’ by such a prolonged and unnecessary tapering regimen.
“Since most physicians do not know this simple trick, it is up to the patient to ask their physician to use the simple method.”

Hopefully he wasn't just giving an "easy-peasy" answer.

The site advises that people make sure to work with a physician (hopefully a knowledgeable one). Plus, I would do a lot of research before starting.
 
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Irat

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I don't know if this would be of any help: https://www.peoplespharmacy.com/articles/how-to-stop-duloxetine-cymbalta-without-withdrawal-symptoms

They had a suggestion from a a board-certified family physician who specializes in pain and addiction who said,
“The best way to stop this drug is to put the patient on fluoxetine (Prozac) for one to two weeks. You then stop the Prozac. Prozac is so long lasting that it gradually decreases blood levels slowly enough so that the discontinuation syndrome doesn’t happen.
“This is simple and inexpensive. It is important, as you say in your article, that people do not stop this medication [duloxetine] on their own. However, it is not necessary to go through the ‘Chinese water torture’ by such a prolonged and unnecessary tapering regimen.
“Since most physicians do not know this simple trick, it is up to the patient to ask their physician to use the simple method.”
Those drugs are really rough to get off of. I've heard of some people experiencing "brain zaps" when trying to go off of that one.

The site advises that people make sure to work with a physician (hopefully a knowledgeable one) as they get off of these drugs. Plus, I would do a lot of research before starting.
That's bs. And "old thinking" from this doc ...,.Fluoxetine can just destroy you as any other one too.....plus even switching an SSRI can cause serious withdrawal.....so this is not true....he said withdrawal won t happen because of the long lasting half time....but it's wrong and has nothing to do with that.anyway you never know in which team you are before your trying an AD,ppl get away with it just fine,but if it hit you it's too late
 

Irat

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Yeah, I edited it because I wondered if he was just giving an "easy-peasy" answer.

Thanks for replying.
Judee,I just edited my post too.ppl can get away with taking an AD, but if it's hit you it's too late,and your brain is f ..,ed....and I will never stop warning ppl .I have lost so many friends over suicide in the last few years from drug damage
 
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Antidepressants have helped many people live somewhat normal lives that would have otherwise been completely overwhelmed by depression/anxiety/ocd. They have their downside: some people respond terribly, withdrawal symptoms are bad, and yes, suicide ideation is a thing that your doctor should be mindful of. They also have numerous other less serious side effects (low libido, weight gain, etc etc). If someone has had previous suicide attempts or is at risk of it then they should be closely monitored.
There is no free lunch when it comes to medication (or anything else in life). You have to weigh the pros and cons.

I take duloxetine for nerve pain and it has done wonders. I know discontinuing will be a nightmare. Using prozac is a very common technique and it works for discontinuation of ADs as @Judee mentioned.

And as I mentioned, they dont do anything for CFS. Except abilify (which is an antipsychotic). Many people have had success with low dose abilify and there are long threads on that on this forum you can check out.