• Welcome to Phoenix Rising!

    Created in 2008, Phoenix Rising is the largest and oldest forum dedicated to furthering the understanding of and finding treatments for complex chronic illnesses such as chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS), fibromyalgia (FM), long COVID, postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome (POTS), mast cell activation syndrome (MCAS), and allied diseases.

    To become a member, simply click the Register button at the top right.

Chronic fatigue syndrome: Suggestions for a nutritional treatment in the therapeutic approach

Murph

:)
Messages
1,795
Biomed Pharmacother. 2019 Jan;109:1000-1007. doi: 10.1016/j.biopha.2018.10.076. Epub 2018 Nov 5.
Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS): Suggestions for a nutritional treatment in the therapeutic approach.
Bjørklund G1, Dadar M2, Pen JJ3, Chirumbolo S4, Aaseth J5.
Author information
Abstract

Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) is known as a multi-systemic and complex illness, which induces fatigue and long-term disability in educational, occupational, social, or personal activities. The diagnosis of this disease is difficult, due to lacking a proper and suited diagnostic laboratory test, besides to its multifaceted symptoms. Numerous factors, including environmental and immunological issues, and a large spectrum of CFS symptoms, have recently been reported.

In this review, we focus on the nutritional intervention in CFS, discussing the many immunological, environmental, and nutritional aspects currently investigated about this disease. Changes in immunoglobulin levels, cytokine profiles and B- and T- cell phenotype and declined cytotoxicity of natural killer cells, are commonly reported features of immune dysregulation in CFS.

Also, some nutrient deficiencies (vitamin C, vitamin B complex, sodium, magnesium, zinc, folic acid, l-carnitine, l-tryptophan, essential fatty acids, and coenzyme Q10) appear to be important in the severity and exacerbation of CFS symptoms. This review highlights a far-driven analysis of mineral and vitamin deficiencies among CFS patients.

KEYWORDS:
Chronic fatigue syndrome; Cytokines; Delayed hypersensitivity; Immunoglobulins; Lymphocyte transformation; Nutrients

PMID:
30551349
DOI:
10.1016/j.biopha.2018.10.076

Paper attached.
 

Attachments

  • 10.1016@j.biopha.2018.10.076.pdf
    959.6 KB · Views: 8

MEPatient345

Guest
Messages
479
My god, so many outright inaccuracies and leaps of imagination in this paper. Many in the first few pages but I stopped reading when I got to this one:

“The etiology of CFS is unknown; however, observations suggest that there may be at least two different etiological subgroups. One subgroup consists of patients with early, often undiagnosed Parkinson’s disease [40] and may have further degenerative brain diseases [41]”
(links to papers about melatonin treatment in CFS and Parkinson’s for footnote 40, and depression in ALS for 41)
 

Murph

:)
Messages
1,795
My god, so many outright inaccuracies and leaps of imagination in this paper. Many in the first few pages but I stopped reading when I got to this one:

“The etiology of CFS is unknown; however, observations suggest that there may be at least two different etiological subgroups. One subgroup consists of patients with early, often undiagnosed Parkinson’s disease [40] and may have further degenerative brain diseases [41]”
(links to papers about melatonin treatment in CFS and Parkinson’s for footnote 40, and depression in ALS for 41)

Yeah I was pretty hopeful for this paper based on the title but when I downloaded it it was a bit shit! By then I'd commited to sharing it here but it certainly doesn't come with a recommendation.
 
Messages
59
Location
Lancashire, UK
My god, so many outright inaccuracies and leaps of imagination in this paper. Many in the first few pages but I stopped reading when I got to this one:

“The etiology of CFS is unknown; however, observations suggest that there may be at least two different etiological subgroups. One subgroup consists of patients with early, often undiagnosed Parkinson’s disease [40] and may have further degenerative brain diseases [41]”
(links to papers about melatonin treatment in CFS and Parkinson’s for footnote 40, and depression in ALS for 41)

Honestly, how the hell did this get published. This sentence alone is enough for rejection, because it proves the authors don't have a good grasp of what ME/CFS is.
 
Last edited: