CDC XMRV pages

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Apologies if this has already been posted. I sort of wanted to know what people thought about what the CDC were saying (not saying) about XMRV.

Their website has two pages. An Overview and Questions & Answers. It was last updated 18 February 2010. Given that there has been a lot of water under the bridge since then is it significant that they have not considered anything that has since transpired worthy enough to update their info?

Or are they just a bit sloppy?

The website says:

What is XMRV?

XMRV is a newly identified human retrovirus that is similar to a mouse retrovirus that scientists have known about for years. XMRV refers to xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus. It was first identified in samples of human prostate cancer tissue. Some additional studies have suggested that a high percentage of persons with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) may be infected with XMRV, but this result needs to be confirmed by other groups of scientists.

The frequency of XMRV infection in healthy persons and the potential role of this virus in causing diseases such as prostate cancer and CFS are unknown at this time. If it is determined that XMRV may have a role in causing disease and illness, prevention recommendations can be made.

http://www.cdc.gov/ncidod/dhqp/bp_xmrv_qa.html

It is also worth noting that the CDC makes no reference to any of the negative studies:

XMRV is a newly identified human retrovirus that is similar to a mouse retrovirus that scientists have known about for years. XMRV refers to xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus. It was first identified in samples of human prostate cancer tissue.

In a study published in October 2009, scientists reported a potential association of XMRV with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS). In this study, XMRV was detected in approximately two-thirds of patients diagnosed with CFS and 3.7 percent of controls.

The frequency of XMRV infection in healthy persons and the potential role of this virus in causing diseases such as prostate cancer and CFS are unknown at this time. If it is determined that XMRV may have a role in causing disease and illness, prevention recommendations can be made.

The report of the October 2009 published study also identified DNA of XMRV in the blood cells of some healthy persons, and suggests a potential for XMRV transmission by transfusion or transplantation. At present, although it is theoretically plausible that XMRV can be transmitted through blood transfusion, no such transmission event has been identified, and there is no known evidence of XMRV infection or XMRV-related illness in transfusion recipients.

These recent findings and a potential link with prostate cancer and CFS must be scientifically and independently evaluated. Several studies are underway to evaluate the risk of XMRV transmission through blood transfusion. Agencies within the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) are conducting studies to determine the prevalence of XMRV in the blood donor population. HHS scientists are also working with scientists in industry and academia to determine if XMRV can be transmitted by blood transfusion. If a link between XMRV and transfusion is established, action will be taken to reduce the risk.

Additionally, a Public Health Service (PHS) working group plans to coordinate testing of specimens to assess transfusion-transmissibility of XMRV. If an agent is found to be transmissible by blood, studies must begin quickly to evaluate if the agent causes disease in transfusion recipients.

HHS agencies, including CDC, will continue to keep the public updated and informed as more information becomes accessible from each of the studies being conducted.

http://www.cdc.gov/ncidod/dhqp/bp_xmrv.html

No mention of negative studies - is that a good sign?
 

Athene

ihateticks.me
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"No mention of negative studies - is that a good sign? "

I reckon it's a very good sign. It seems to suggest htey are still fully open minded.
I certainly hope so.
 

bullybeef

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I have been thinking about this too. It could work both ways, and without sounding pessimistic, if the CDC hit us with on the blind side with a study suggesting they couldn't replicate the WPI's findings; by not mentioning the other negative studies maybe show they haven't been influenced by anyone else. And their negative study would become the benchmark, and the basis to remove the ME/XMRV association once and for all.

Saying this, I don't think they can completely remove XMRV from the consciousness of so many people though, and I suspect they may accept XMRV does exist and probably causes other diseases. Simply because people have it, and they may just say these people didn't have ME in the first place, and XMRV and ME have very similar symptoms!!

At this stage, I believe they may try anything to discredit the XMRV/ME link. Remember, the CDC (and most medical institutions globally) won’t accept any biomarkers for ME, so they could pretty much play on this. And remember, you can be ‘healthy’ and have XMRV!
 

jspotila

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Just to be clear, the German study was not done by CDC and it did not involve CFS patients.

Regarding the status of CDC's website on XMRV, the CDC is very very slow in updating their websites, at least in regard to CFS. Actually, slow is putting it mildly.
 

CBS

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Just to be clear, the German study was not done by CDC and it did not involve CFS patients.

Regarding the status of CDC's website on XMRV, the CDC is very very slow in updating their websites, at least in regard to CFS. Actually, slow is putting it mildly.
This is on the CDC's web-page because it is being published by the CDC journal Emerging Infectious Diseases. It is being expedited for the June, 2010 issue: http://www.cdc.gov/ncidod/EID/index.htm