Can you use this type of iodine?

Messages
92
Likes
46
I struggle to find iodine for injection all I can find is this which is usually used as contrast agent when performing computed tomography (CT) and such to get a better visual. The description states: Active ingredient: Ultravist (iopromide) 0.623 mg / ml (equivalent to 300 mg / ml of iodine). So I would be getting a hefty dose of iodine. And another brand called iohexol (Iohexolum), Tomogexol (yogexol),Tomoscan (iopamidol),Betadine , Triombrast etc.

Is there something I should be aware of? Do you need to prepare this blue liquid in a special way? I just need to get iodine. I think the contrast improvement on the image comes from the excess levels of iodine in the blood so I would not take this frequently. The only difference between this and regular iodine is this has much higher dose (I think) which produces its blue colour. Would injecting this into muscle or SUBQ cause extreme pain? a tiny percent of the iodine will be unbound and given that it is 300mg of iodine in there and rda is like 200 mcg I could be getting a few mg's enough to sustain myself.

Are there any other products with iodine bound to it?Does Ultravist contain iodine? I understand it is an iodinated contrast but once in the blood does the iodine separate from the contrast into individual iodine atoms and thus affect the body the same way iodine does from food? does it have the same tonicity of your plasma when making your own?
Does Ultravist contain iodine?

ANSWER: Yes, Ultravist contains iodine in the form of the active substance iopromid. It is iodine that allows Ultravist to be used as a contrast enhancer, as it blocks X-rays. [1]



Is iodine separated from the contrast into individual iodine atoms?

ANSWER: No, after administration, the active substance in Ultravist, iopromid, will be excreted almost exclusively from the body unchanged, ie the iodine atoms remain. [1] CAN YOU SEPERATE THEM BY MIXING AND DISSOLVING IN PURER WATER? If you dont use enough water for a solvent it wont dissolve all properly.



Does it affect the body in the same way that iodine does from food?

ANSWER: It is difficult to answer the question as we do not compare with Ultravist with iodine from food. You will find a complete list of side effects in section 4 of the Package Leaflet. Like all medicines, Ultravist can cause side effects, although not everybody gets them. I package leaflet, you can e.g. read more about the most serious side effects, as well as how common the side effects are (including the non-serious ones), which are noted in connection with the use of Ultravist [1]. If you are undergoing treatment with Ultravist and are worried about any side effects, we recommend that you contact your healthcare provider for a discussion within the treatment.
we have different processes and regulations to deal with for handling questions from patients / users and healthcare professionals ..

I am a student who wants to become a biomedical researcher in healthcare and I have to work with this type of medicine. why do i keep touching my wound my sleep schedule likes certain times idk why but its 4-5am to around 1-2 PM stick for it the longest before move back to a more normal one as others



Organic agents which covalently bind the iodine have fewer side effects as they do not dissociate into component molecules. Many of the side effects are due to the hyperosmolar solution being injected. i.e. they deliver more iodine atoms per molecule. The more iodine, the more "dense" the X-ray effect.

Organic iodine molecules used for contrast include iohexol, iodixanol, and ioversol
 
Last edited:
Messages
92
Likes
46
Would eating seaweed be safer? (I think that's high iodine, but not sure anymore)
I have gut issues, therefore getting it orally is out of the question. Obviously I would prefer getting my nutrients via the oral route.

AMINOL (made from or for russian,ukraine,poland name translated etc):
COMPOSITION active ingredients: 1 ml of solution contains: alanine - 6.4 mg; arginine hydrochloride - 6.4 mg; valine - 4.9 mg; histidine hydrochloride monohydrate - 3.2 mg; glycine - 8.0 mg; isoleucine - 4.4 mg, leucine - 9.8 mg; lysine hydrochloride - 11.5 mg; methionine - 5.7 mg; proline - 6.4 mg, threonine - 4.3 mg; tryptophan - 1.44 mg; phenylalanine - 7.0 mg; other components: sorbitol, water for injections. Read more:

Aminosol:
500 ml: L-valine 2.75 g: L-isoleucine 2.6 g; L-leucine 4.45 g; L-lysine (in the form
L-lysine acetate 7.83 g) 5.55 g; L-methionine 1.9 g; L-threonine 4.3 g; L-phenylalanine 2.75 g;
L-tryptophan 0.8 g; L-arginine 10 g; L-histidine 3.65 g; L-alanine 12.5 g; glycine 9.25 g;
L-proline 8.5 g; L-serine 4.8 g; L-tyrosine 0.2 g; taurine 1 g;
additionaly: acetic acid, malic acid, water for injections.
B6 has a noticeable odor

Aminosteril ? Aminoven? can mixing it with somth acidic like vitamin c destroy them? or just dissolve them into smaller bits like stomach acid? Injecting too close to surface makes skin ballon up
 
Last edited:
Messages
92
Likes
46
Got something finally : Ultravist and free iodine content
SUMMARY •
The safety concern regarding thyroid function is related to free iodine contained in iodinated contrast media (ICM), such as iopromide, as iodine is an essential micronutrient for thyroid hormone synthesis, but both excess and lack of iodine can adversely influence thyroid function.1,2 • The recommended daily intake of iodine for adults is about 150 μg. 3-5 • Quality control demands that the concentration of free iodine does not exceed a certain limit based on regulatory frames, such as the European Pharmacopoeia.6 • A contrast-enhanced diagnostic CT scan using iopromide 300, i.e., containing 300 mg of iodine per ml, with a typical volume of 100 ml results in a nominal intake of 30 g iodine. Yet, this iodine is firmly bound and not available for the thyroid gland. However, every ICM solution contains a certain amount of free iodine. 5,7-9 • The range of free inorganic iodide and iodine were determined in several commonly used ionic and nonionic intravenous contrast media in a publication from 1992, but do not include iopromide.10 • Please refer to all applicable sections on thyroid safety within the Ultravist product labelling.

CLINICAL DATA A literature search on EMBASE and PubMed on February 28th, 2022 using search terms ‘iopromide’ AND ‘free iodine’ OR ‘free iodide’ failed to find any literature on studies that investigated the quantity of free iodine within iopromide. A study by Laurie et al. (1992)10 determined the range of free iodine in several other ICM has been included in the reference section. A further literature search found one systematic review that may be of relevance to your enquiry and has been summarized below. In a systematic review by Bervini et al. (2021)8 the incidence of hyperthyroidism after iodinated contrast media (ICM) exposure was assessed. Studies published between 1946 and May 2018 were systematically searched for on MEDLINE, Embase, and the Cochrane Library and were considered eligible if they investigated the association between hyperthyroidism and iodinated contrast. The literature search yielded 1493 articles. Of these, 30 articles met the final selection criteria and were included in the analysis. Data on study design, baseline characteristics, and outcomes were extracted independently by two reviewers. The time endpoint to assess thyroid hormone levels after ICM exposure varied between 1 and 541 days among studies, with most studies having a time endpoint between 7 and 56 days. The overall estimated prevalence of overt hyperthyroidism after ICM exposure was extremely low (0.1% [confidence interval, CI 0–0.6%]), and did not change after adjustments for baseline thyroid function status (0.3% in euthyroid patients at baseline [CI 0–1.7%]). There were no cases with overt hyperthyroidism at 7 days after ICM exposure, and the incidence was very low at 30 days (0.2% [CI 0–0.8%]). The authors concluded that the incidence of iodine-induced hyperthyroidism (IIH) after ICM administration during radiographic procedures is extremely low.

FURTHER INFORMATION European Society of Urogenital Radiology (ESUR) In one publication by the ESUR, it is stated that7 : • ‘According to the quality control regulations for production of water-soluble contrast media the content of free iodide per ml is far below the total amount of (organically bound) iodine per ml. In a bottle with a contrast medium concentration of 300 mgI/ml, the upper limit of free iodide is generally below 50 μg/ml directly after production and below 90 μg/ml after 3–5 years of shelf-life. In most products the actual content of free iodide is below one-tenth of these upper limits, depending on the time between production and date of use. Nevertheless, a 200-ml dose of a contrast medium containing 35 μg/ml provides 7,000 μg free iodide, equivalent to 45 times the recommended daily intake. In addition, Rendl et al. (2001)9 have shown that iodinated contrast media molecules can be deiodinated in the body. The resulting amount of free iodide depends on the time that the contrast medium is circulating and is 0.01–0.15% of the amount of organically bound iodine administered. Biliary contrast media circulate longer and are metabolized at a greater rate resulting in the release of a significant amount of free iodide in the circulation. Therefore, the effects on the thyroid may be greater and persist longer than for the other water-soluble media.’

I had better success when I used other countries google search to research and use their language. Also use a site that shows were the sites are hosted from could indicated where they are but not always. Shipment too big to carry and ship within not enough sales from here.

Thyroid/T3/T4 extract injectable hard to find.
 
Last edited:
Messages
10
Likes
21
Could you please let me know (if at all possible, I understand completely if not) where to find the benefits/effects of injectable iodine?