Can POTS cause heart palpitations (at night) ?

Booble

Senior Member
Messages
1,359
Also, keep in mind mold reactions can cause heart racing for seemingly no reason. And perimenopause. (Not sure if you are female or male.)
 

LINE

Senior Member
Messages
606
Location
USA
What form of C? Liposomal? Ascorbic acid? Buffered in some way? Or just plain ol' C?

I agree, it's a great stress-buster, and in conjunction with mag gly, a great life-saver, at least for me ....

I buy Quali C with the idea that is the only C made outside of China. This is not to say that others are necessarily bad although I did have a bad experience with another brand of C. However, I do look at labels on Vit C and don't understand the chemical additives.

Liposomal C never made much of a difference. I will say that Liposomal Glutathione was a game changer though. It was the only form of glutathione that had a profound effective. I used to make liposomal preparations at home with an Ultrasonic cleaner and tried a number of concoctions.

I used Ascorbates (Vitamin C ascorbates) which has a better pH (more alkaline), but I have not used those in years. Some advocate for natural forms of Vitamin C which I have tried as well.

In terms of crisis intervention, pulsing Vit C is a big help. On the hour, every hour is a rule I use.

I also believe strongly in Vitamin E (natural, not synthetic). Vitamin E scavenges lipid peroxidation, or the oxidative stress that attacks cell membranes. I remember reading a quote from Majid Ali MD who treated CFS people. Basically, the gist was that cell membranes are attacked via oxidative stress and when they are attacked, they become weakened.
 

Marylib

Senior Member
Messages
1,094
When I developed POTS, there was no mistaking it for the former situation - the palpitations, generalized dizzy all the time, weird feeling in my heart.. It was a whole new level of disability. Night and day makes no difference. Only lying down and not lying down. Walking - as long as I don't stop - is easier than not walking (leg muscle help pump the insufficient blood volume against gravity). So maybe this is something that will pass or resolve itself in time, or you will find something that helps. Hang in there!
 

Booble

Senior Member
Messages
1,359
When I developed POTS, there was no mistaking it for the former situation - the palpitations, generalized dizzy all the time, weird feeling in my heart.. It was a whole new level of disability. Night and day makes no difference. Only lying down and not lying down. Walking - as long as I don't stop - is easier than not walking (leg muscle help pump the insufficient blood volume against gravity). So maybe this is something that will pass or resolve itself in time, or you will find something that helps. Hang in there!

I used to find it so strange that I could have lower heart rate while walking then while just standing.
Before I knew any of this one of my first bad bouts was in the shower. Hot showers and my heart rate would go wild (along with my jaw joint hurting which really scared me). I didn't know anything about pooling of the blood at that point but I remembered how runners have to walk at the end of the run so as not to put all the strain on the heart and let their legs be like a second heart -- so I started shaking my legs while in the shower when the fast heart beat came on (about 1/2 way into shower) and that helped a lot.
(When I went to a doctor about it he looked perplexed at why in the shower. Ordered all the normal heart tests but then I chickened out and didn't go to them. )
 

Butydoc

Senior Member
Messages
790
A couple of years ago, and just recently, I've experienced irregular heartbeat and a racing heart rate.
This happens at night when I wake up and need to go to the bathroom.

If I don't get up very slowly and do everything in slow motion, when I lay down again, my heart goes irregular.
Last night my irregular heartbeat turned into a 130 bpm racing one for 5 mins which scared me.

The heart palpitations happened a couple of years ago, but I got my blood sugar under better control, and it seemed to help somehow. Maybe blood sugar levels and POTS and heart palpitations are related(?)

Anyway, just looking for some comments on this and if anyone has experienced this too, and perhaps some things that could help.
Hi Bansaw,

It’s sounds like to me you are having a dysautonomic response at night with the full badder causing a tachycardia. When you get up your pots probably causes your blood pressure to drop which triggers PAF( proximal atrial fibrillation). If you could afford an I watch then you could record these events.

A urinal while this is happening probably will prevent this type of cardiac arrhythmia so that you don’t have to get up and pee at night. If you show your doc a recording of this type of event, he/she might prescribe a beta blocker type of drug which might prevent this abnormal heart beat.

Anyway, I would bring this to the attention of your doctor.
 

Butydoc

Senior Member
Messages
790
@Bansaw
Beta blockers can have some really uncomfortable side effects for some people. Do a quick google before you decide that that's the way to go ....
I agree that beta blockers have some dry backs but if the abnormal rhythm is PAF, then the risk of stroke probable out way the side effects of a a beta blocker. Again, I would try and get a recording of these events to properly diagnose and treat.
 

Booble

Senior Member
Messages
1,359
I agree that beta blockers have some dry backs but if the abnormal rhythm is PAF, then the risk of stroke probable out way the side effects of a a beta blocker. Again, I would try and get a recording of these events to properly diagnose and treat.

The relevant question is probably are these true irregular heartbeats as defined medically or is it the kind of thing that FEELS like irregular heartbeat but medically would be considered normal. If the former, than the beta blockers sound like they'd be important as Buty says. If the latter then maybe the beta blockers would be more optional if they made you feel better.
 

YippeeKi YOW !!

Senior Member
Messages
15,847
Location
Second star to the right ...
@Bansaw
I agree with @Butydoc and @Booble …. don’t take beta-blockers casually, and definitely not without deeper investigation of what’s causing your reactions ad symptoms.


There are beta-receptors all over your body, not just in your heart, so beta blockers can affect way more systems than just the cardiac, depending on the type they give you. Metropolol is an example of a cardio-beta-1 blocker.

There are newer third generation beta blockers, which have additional effects, helping to further relax blood vessels and reduce high blood pressure.


MODE OF ACTION AND SIDE EFFECTS
Since beta blockers slow down your heart function, fatigue, dizziness and hypotension are among the side effects, not particularly desirable for ME patients with POTS, since this would inevitably make that worse.


Because your heart is pumping more slowly, circulation is reduced to your extremities which are also affected negatively with resultant coldness and tingling in hands, feet, and legs.

Like most meds that lower blood pressure, there’s also the risk for men of sexual dysfunction, something I gather they dont regard with much enthusiasm.

Gastrointestinally, beta-1 blockers side effects include upset stomach, nausea, and diarrhea or constipation, tho taking beta-blockers with food may help reduce those.

Some of the older non-selective beta blockers also cause weight gain, tho doctors arently sure why, positing that it might be bcause of a general metabolic slowdown.


BUT WAIT …. THERE’S MORE !!!
Depression, insomnia, and nightmares are also more common with the older generations of beta-blockers. Personally, I have as much depression and insomnia, along with occasional bad dreasms, as I can currently accommodate, and wouldn’t be entirely enthused aout adding more..


There are additional and more serious problems if you already have lung issues or diabetes.

And of course, you’re urged to immediately call your prescribing doctor if you experience any of the following: shortness of breath, tight chest, wheezing, a cough that worsens with exercise, chest pain, swollen legs and/or ankles, or irregular heartbeat, indicative of potentially serious heart or lung problems.

Also yellowing of the skin and the whites of your eyes (jaundice), signs of liver problems.


THERE’S ALSO A SOMEWHAT INCREASED RISK OF STROKE
Drs don’t fully understand why, but generally, if your blood pressure is too low, it could create shocky conditions and possibly explain the somewhat heightened risk of stroke…



INTERACTIONS
Beta blockers of all kinds also interact badly with a wide array of other medications, including anti-depressants, antihistimines, statins, decongestants and most cold medications, NSAIDS including ibuprofen, diabetes meds, muscle relaxants like Baclofen and all benzodiazepines, and several others that escape me right now.


They also interact with alcohol and coffee or anything containing caffeine.


DON’T DISCONTINUE THEM ABRUPTLY
You’ll need to taper off of beta blockers if you find they don’t agree with you or you cant tolerate the side effects. This can be a difficult and sometimes lengthy process, tho not usually that lengthy with beta-blockers …. and of course, the unpleasant side-effects will continu during the taper.
 

Rufous McKinney

Senior Member
Messages
11,900
I used to find it so strange that I could have lower heart rate while walking then while just standing.


it sure makes sense when you feel it.....

Just standing is really hard! I'm ok in the kitchen for 10 minutes, leaning on counters (then I tell myself to use the core and not do this leaning)....

Walking a bit is less AWFUL feeling than just standing.
 

Rufous McKinney

Senior Member
Messages
11,900
don’t take beta-blockers casually, and definitely not without deeper investigation of what’s causing your reactions ad symptoms.

I take one 50 mg metropolol for high BP. then somehow I have some personal version of OI and have had BAD tachycardia in Oaxaca. So its on my list of: things I don' t understand.

When I get my acute stomach thing, I go off the pill immediately as nothing stays down and this time I was off for nearly six weeks.
 

Marylib

Senior Member
Messages
1,094
If beta blockers don't agree with you, you'll know it. They didn't agree with me. Ivabradine does and also mestinon. Best thing for me, however, is IV saline. Great stuff. It's not a drug and it does the job using only normal saline.