Buddhism & CFS

MEKoan

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I'm finding that the FEAR of how I REACT to the hole is the worst part of it. :(:Retro tongue::Retro tongue:

Once in meditation, I had a realization that "the reaction is optional."
Now I just need to remember that.
Beautiful summation, DB, of what the dharma is about.

We practice so that we can remember that "the reaction is optional" and so that our thoughts exist in more spaciousness allowing for a response instead of a reaction.

I always forget before I remember.

One hopes to remember more swiftly in future :Sign Please: and, with practice,

one does.
:Sign Peace:

:thumbsup:
 
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Dreambirdie, Hi IF--Thanks for posting this.
my pleasure.

I've been falling in a lot of setback holes lately,
:( me too

so it's good to read.
:Retro smile:

I'm finding that the FEAR of how I REACT to the hole is the worst part of it. :(:Retro tongue::Retro tongue:
:worried::eek: Oh our clever egos - a third level.

Once in meditation, I had a realization that "the reaction is optional." Now I just need to remember that.
I love it when remembering is enough. It's like magic - oh - I see the story - poof - it's gone - how nice.

One of my nicknames used to be 'the diplomat' as I wouldn't get reactive or flustered often, wouldn't get pulled into other people's stories, but could stay engaged, compassionate, fairly clear-headed, and even funny. And I used to think quickly on my feet - no longer. With ME/CFS I get the emotional lability symptom occassionally. One doctor explained it as critical thinking in the frontal cortex being a higher order function. When our energy is disappearing, it stops going to all non-essential for life functions. So the higher-order thinking is one of the first to go, leaving limbic-brain reactions - meeting anger with anger or fear.....Or getting teary, frustrated, not knowing how to handle something...........

I didn't know this person before. I try to strategize and only deal with challenging situations when I'm well rested, but life doesn't always oblige. So now am being my spiritual path at the reptilian level I guess. It's like George's signature. You are how you react. I'm getting to see more of my reptilian-brain reactions - and let them go. They are pretty powerful sometimes.

So - I guess it's an opportunity to bring that beautiful breathing space between impetus and action, to bring conciousness and choice to this level, to my reptilian brain. - hey - where's the at-peace-meditating smiley?
 

Dreambirdie

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I try to strategize and only deal with challenging situations when I'm well rested, but life doesn't always oblige. So now am being my spiritual path at the reptilian level I guess. It's like George's signature. You are how you react. I'm getting to see more of my reptilian-brain reactions - and let them go. They are pretty powerful sometimes.

So - I guess it's an opportunity to bring that beautiful breathing space between impetus and action, to bring conciousness and choice to this level, to my reptilian brain. - hey - where's the at-peace-meditating smiley?
Hi IF--

Sometimes the IDEAL and the REAL are just too far apart.

In those instances, I just surrender to the reptiles and let them PAINT!
 
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Oops - Koan - you posted as I was composing (typo I almost left was composting - hmmm)

So well said - 'we practice so we can remember' ' allowing a response instead of a reaction'

It's true for me sometimes with somethings that with practice I remember a bit more swiftly and consistently. But then that became an ego-trap for me too. I want to always remember, I don't want to be reactive, I want to remember quicker, I want to avoid pain.......

My ego is very clever (little giggle to roaring laughter)

So I continue to practice, I notice when I'm less reactive (and ego appreciates it! - and I notice that too), and I try to try without trying to not want anything to be different than it is/was.:Retro smile::Retro smile::Retro smile::Retro smile::Retro smile::Retro smile::Retro smile:
 

Sing

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Hi All!

Jumping in to say that he ego thinks it has to handle every situation but sometimes it just needs to stop!....And let something else emerge....The direction, however, is "Stop!" It isn't stop and judge either. Just "Stop".

Sing
 
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Hi All!

Jumping in to say that he ego thinks it has to handle every situation but sometimes it just needs to stop!....And let something else emerge....The direction, however, is "Stop!" It isn't stop and judge either. Just "Stop".

Sing
Welcome Sing!

So true. Just to remember there are other options. Space. And to let go, stop, snap out of it.

I’ve been trying to find a picture of a reptile madly painting for dreambirdie. Instead, all I’ve found is this, which is more like me wrestling instead of letting go!:rolleyes::Retro redface::eek:
 

Sing

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Stop and drop the Croc!:D I like that!

I have been picturing the dynosaurs, how the largest, most aggressive reptiles the world has ever seen didn't survive--they stopped!

But out of that demise came a new form, the birds--our musical accompaniment, those flowers in flight--

How one idea turned into a whole other one--quite a spin in evolution, like our own minds can do too.

Sing
 

Dreambirdie

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The MASTERY OF LIFE is KNOWING WHEN TO STOP.

One of my favorite quotes (Alan Watts I think). I have been needing to keep this in mind... to do less and rest more.
So my computer time will now be minimal.

:hug: to all of you and see you when I do.
 

Advocate

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Prisoners learn Vipassana meditation technique

http://www.npr.org/2011/02/08/133505880/at-end-of-the-line-prison-an-unlikely-escape

On National Public Radio today there was a beautiful piece about the Vipassana meditation technique. It is being taught to groups of prisoners at a maximum-security prison in Alabama, with good results both for the prisoners and the institution. The teachers are supplied by a meditation center in Shelburne Falls, Massachusetts, which is known for the rigor of its technique. The prisoners sit (barely moving) about 12 hours a day for ten days and maintain "noble" silence as they practice the technique--i.e., they don't speak or make eye contact, except with the teacher.

A film on the same subject, Dhamma Brothers, has recently become available on Netflix. Its a terrific film, and if you watch it be sure to look at the extra material, which explains the technique fairly clearly. The prisoners speak about their experience, and it is clear that they understand Vipassana, and that they are committed to using it to improve their lives. (Most of them will die in the prison.)

Sadly, prisoners and severely ill people with CFS have something in common: four walls and a ceiling.