Breathing Disregulation - ME Related?

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My breathing issues seem to be related to stress/anxiety, doing things quickly, or concentrating on a project. I stop breathing during those times and then, to make up for lack of oxygen, take in too much air, which results in excess gas in my tummy, more anxiety, and dizziness. It's hard to explain. Somehow my innate ability to know how to breathe correctly gets thrown off and it can be weeks before it somewhat normalizes. I've tried all sorts of breathing exercises, but these can actually make things worse at times. Breathing out through pursed lips to get the excess air/gas out is helpful and also mouth breathing while I'm doing activities (helps me not to hold my breath). Normally I breathe fine when sleeping, but the moment I wake up, the breathing difficulties start up again.

I wonder if my issues might be part of ME neurological issues, weak muscles, mitochondria insufficiency, or a combination of things. The daytime apnea does put a strain on my heart. Does anyone have similar issues or thoughts on this issue?
 
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I" ve had issues with holding my breath...then sort of gasping. Its possibly stress related thing. Seems like I read that in the past.

My husband used to know when I wake up, because I start this breath holding.

I noticed back when I ' read a book (which I can no longer do)..I'd hold my breath...then gasp.

I think I'm less stressed and do this less often now.
 

lenora

Senior Member
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Breathing is a big part of having ME. My problems seem to come and go, but lately I've found that even exictment on a TV show can leave me feeling breathless. Now in my case, this may also be a symptom of anxiety....I don't know.

Taking slow deep breaths through your nose only, holding it for a count of 10 and then slowly letting it go does seem to help. Foods with MSG in them are a trigger for me, along with other symptoms.

If a CPAP machine is needed, a diagnosis from a Sleep Clinic (which checks for many problems) is usually the way this is handled. I've been twice, and no obvious reasons were ever found. Of course I don't sleep, so does that count?

An x-ray, plus listening for heart problems, etc., can help with this problem. Severe allergies can also cause problems, far more than we realize. I have found that I'm OK during the day but experience the shortness of breath while sitting in bed at night. A full stomach doesn't help. As a result, I tend to eat very early. If I'm lying flat, I don't have problems.

I have had a heart attack and have 7 stents....with more to come. I do not have heart failure, so I'll ask both my neurologist (35+ years) and my cardiologist about this problem. Chance are it will disappear before my next appointments.....but!

Perhaps overly concentrating on what you're doing is causing you to hold your breath without realizing it. I tend to do that myself. I wish you well. Lenora
 
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My breathing issues seem to be related to stress/anxiety, doing things quickly, or concentrating on a project. I stop breathing during those times and then, to make up for lack of oxygen, take in too much air, which results in excess gas in my tummy, more anxiety, and dizziness. It's hard to explain. Somehow my innate ability to know how to breathe correctly gets thrown off and it can be weeks before it somewhat normalizes. I've tried all sorts of breathing exercises, but these can actually make things worse at times. Breathing out through pursed lips to get the excess air/gas out is helpful and also mouth breathing while I'm doing activities (helps me not to hold my breath). Normally I breathe fine when sleeping, but the moment I wake up, the breathing difficulties start up again.

I wonder if my issues might be part of ME neurological issues, weak muscles, mitochondria insufficiency, or a combination of things. The daytime apnea does put a strain on my heart. Does anyone have similar issues or thoughts on this issue?
Just to add to my post, I noticed that I was unconsciously closing the back of my throat. I'm not sure how to explain the physiology of it, but I noticed that when I drank a glass of water I suddenly felt like something opened and I was getting more air. So, I ran with that revelation and am now doing much better. I must be very vigilant about keeping my nasal/throat airway open when I am doing things that trigger involuntary wrong breathing, and also when I am more exhausted than normal.
 

Booble

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YES.
I do that same thing with not breathing when I'm concentrating on something. Sometimes that triggers a migraine "scintillating scotoma" aura. It happens a lot when I'm looking at something online intently -- studying a photograph. Especially if it's something emotional or exciting. I sort of bare down and I don't breathe. I didn't know that I did that until maybe 8 or 9 months ago.