Brain inflammation research?

Messages
21
Likes
36
I know there are some scientists doing research into brain inflammation in ME. Jarred Younger is one of them. I remember seeing some articles saying scientists were looking for drugs that could target the brain inflammation in ME. Might have been someone else (Klimas maybe?) looking at it separately to Younger. Anyway my question is, what's the likely time-frame for them finding a treatment for the inflammation? Is next couple of years too much to hope? (In terms of availability as well!)
 
Messages
875
Likes
1,693
Location
South east England
There is a lot of reseach into brain inflammation in general as it (inflammation) is considered to be a key part of many common disorders ie Dementia. There are already drugs to treat the suspected brain inflammation in ME. Steroids for instance, including Dexamethasone. There is a fairly new drug called Kineret which has been used for inflammation following Stroke. Looks promising and it would be interesting to see if any of the ME/CFS researchers look into it. So If ME is partly due to brain inflammation the drugs to treat it are already available.
 
Messages
1,257
Likes
1,770
My feeling is that treatment for ME won't be as simple as an existing antiinflammatory drug. Steroids seem to trigger remission in ME patients, but only for one or two courses of the drug, and then they stop working. Something in ME seems to adjust to such treatments. I think a more likely treatment will target whatever it is that is trying to keep us in this inflammatory state.

While that 'other target' isn't obvious at present, I do think there's a reasonable chance of discovering the cause in the next few years. If that can be treated with existing approved drugs, then we could get relief quickly.
 
Messages
1,550
Likes
3,284
Location
United States, New Hampshire
It seems to be (at least for some) a feature of this illness- a treatment works for a while then the effect wears off. But the effect of Branched Chain Amino Acids seems to be something that does endure.
I agree. I've been taking BCAA's for almost a year now and they are just as effective now as they were when I started them.
 
Messages
1,257
Likes
1,770
Yes, I've encountered several 'works great for a while, then stops working forever after' treatments. Pesky ME seems to be very adaptive. BCAAs don't work reliably for me. They were effective at blocking (or delaying and spreading out) the increased transport of tryptophan into my brain after eating simple carbs, but I solved that by avoiding simple carbs. BCAAs seemed to provide some relief from an increase in symptoms a while back, but I'm not sure. I have only two treatments that still work reliably for me: cumin, and iodine or T2. Reliable and effective for me, but no one else has reported significant benefits from them.