Blood test interpretation (high IL-10)

crypt0cu1t

IG: @crypt0cu1t
Messages
598
Likes
1,628
Location
California
I had an opportunity to have a proinflammtory cytokine panel done to figure out the cause of my high ESR/CRP.

I was expecting more cytokines to be elevated, but the only one that was high was IL-10. Does anyone know the function of IL10 or if this could help me determine the source of my inflammation?
 

vision blue

What big eyes...
Messages
1,643
Likes
2,128
I thought IL-10 was one of the good guys but it's been a while since i've checked and i guess everything is a double edged sword. One thing you want to look up is if that suggests you are leaning towards th1 or th2. YOu should be able to find that easy enough.

At least you had something show up on your cytokine panel. All of mine were within range. Which was your lab? Mine was sent to ARUP. If it was a differnt lab, do your reference ranges have lower limits or just upper limits? I.e. on mine, normal range was listed as less than or equal, so for IL 10, normal range was less than or equal 5 and my value just listed as less than 5.

Could you check your value at "IL 2 receptor (CD 25)"? That was the only one of mine with an actual number , 380, and with ref range as less than 1035 or something like that being normal.

I always run very low crp though even when deathly ill.

I would also be interested to know if you had it done at the lab where it was analyzed or you used a local draw station that then sent it over.
 

crypt0cu1t

IG: @crypt0cu1t
Messages
598
Likes
1,628
Location
California
I thought IL-10 was one of the good guys but it's been a while since i've checked and i guess everything is a double edged sword. One thing you want to look up is if that suggests you are leaning towards th1 or th2. YOu should be able to find that easy enough.

At least you had something show up on your cytokine panel. All of mine were within range. Which was your lab? Mine was sent to ARUP. If it was a differnt lab, do your reference ranges have lower limits or just upper limits? I.e. on mine, normal range was listed as less than or equal, so for IL 10, normal range was less than or equal 5 and my value just listed as less than 5.

Could you check your value at "IL 2 receptor (CD 25)"? That was the only one of mine with an actual number , 380, and with ref range as less than 1035 or something like that being normal.

I always run very low crp though even when deathly ill.

I would also be interested to know if you had it done at the lab where it was analyzed or you used a local draw station that then sent it over.
Yeah, it's a bit strange considering I have a constantly elevated ESR/CRP. It makes me wonder if it's just my body trying to dampen down the inflammation. As for the level, the reference range is 2.8 and my level was 3.5

My IL 2 Receptor level was 771.2 with a cutoff at 858. I'm not too sure what exactly this means.
 

sometexan84

Senior Member
Messages
1,154
Likes
2,393
I had same result. I'll share what I have, it's not much....

High IL-10 associated w/

• Lymphocytic Choriomeningitis Virus
o Plasmodium falciparum (Parasite)
• Rheumatoid Arthritis
• Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE)
• Scleroderma (Systemic Sclerosis)
• Kawasaki disease

IL-10
Cytokine that suppresses IFN-γ secretion in CD8+ TILs. IL-10 blockade enhances the effects of anti-PD-1 therapy in expanding antigen-specific CD8+ T cells.

• CVB4 is dependent on IL-10 for persistent viral infection.

o Lytic EBV reactivation causes inflammatory cytokines: interleukin-6 (IL-6), IL-8, IL-10, and IL-13

May want to read this - The Role of IL-10 in Autoimmune Pathology
 

crypt0cu1t

IG: @crypt0cu1t
Messages
598
Likes
1,628
Location
California
I had same result. I'll share what I have, it's not much....

High IL-10 associated w/

• Lymphocytic Choriomeningitis Virus
o Plasmodium falciparum (Parasite)
• Rheumatoid Arthritis
• Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE)
• Scleroderma (Systemic Sclerosis)
• Kawasaki disease

IL-10
Cytokine that suppresses IFN-γ secretion in CD8+ TILs. IL-10 blockade enhances the effects of anti-PD-1 therapy in expanding antigen-specific CD8+ T cells.

• CVB4 is dependent on IL-10 for persistent viral infection.

o Lytic EBV reactivation causes inflammatory cytokines: interleukin-6 (IL-6), IL-8, IL-10, and IL-13

May want to read this - The Role of IL-10 in Autoimmune Pathology
Have you tested positive for any other autoantibodies since we last spoke?
 

sometexan84

Senior Member
Messages
1,154
Likes
2,393
Have you tested positive for any other autoantibodies since we last spoke?
Nothing since my TS-HDS IgM AB.

I sort of slowed down on autoantibody testing since then. I'm just not sure if finding more antibodies will change my treatment plans at all. Especially if I end up doing IVIG.

If I do more AB testing, these are at the top of my list...
  • Gliadin
  • Intrinsic Factor
  • C1q
 

vision blue

What big eyes...
Messages
1,643
Likes
2,128
Y As for the level, the reference range is 2.8 and my level was 3.5

My IL 2 Receptor level was 771.2 with a cutoff at 858. .
Thanks. Do you mean reference range e was <2.8 or was there a range like 1.0-2.8?
And same for the other one- was the range <858 or someting like 200-858?

The reason i asked about the lab is that I think this requires careful specimin handling and I"m pretty sure my lab is too busy and is not very careful. That combined with several hops before it got to ARUP makes me wonder about quality.

Plus curious if labs other than ARUP do this.

with always elevated SED etc, I'd recommend getting your immunuglobulins checked so you can see if it's IgG that's elevated or something else. (and of course a zillion other recommendations!)
 

CSMLSM

Senior Member
Messages
830
Likes
847
I had an opportunity to have a proinflammtory cytokine panel done to figure out the cause of my high ESR/CRP.

I was expecting more cytokines to be elevated, but the only one that was high was IL-10. Does anyone know the function of IL10 or if this could help me determine the source of my inflammation?
Hi, Interleukin 10 downregulates (reduces) the innate arm of the immune system and adaptive but stimulates the humoral adaptive immune system, B cells.
EBV produces a Viral form of Interleukin 10 in order to help its persistence. EBV has been indicated as the causing factor in ME/CFS, MS and other neurological conditions.

Interleukin 10 is a potent growth and differentiation factor for activated human B lymphocytes.

Abstract
Interleukin 10 (IL-10), originally identified as a TH2 helper T-cell product able to inhibit cytokine production by TH1 cells, is highly homologous to BCRF1 (viral IL-10), an open reading frame in the Epstein-Barr virus genome. Here, we show that human and viral IL-10 stimulate DNA replication of B lymphocytes activated either via their antigen receptor or via their CD40 antigen. IL-4 and IL-10 display additive effects and induce a strong increase in the number of viable cells. Moreover, IL-10 induces activated B cells to secrete large amounts of IgG, IgA, and IgM, and the combination of IL-10 and IL-4 results in the secretion of the four immunoglobulin isotypes. Thus, IL-10 may play an important role in the amplification of humoral responses.

Interleukin 10 is a potent growth and differentiation factor for activated human B lymphocytes. - PMC (nih.gov)

Interleukin-10-producing B cells and the regulation of immunity

Abstract
B cells are usually considered primarily for their unique capacity to produce antibodies after differentiation into plasma cells. In addition to their roles as antibody-producing cells, it has become apparent during the last 10 years that B cells also perform important functions in immunity through the production of cytokines. In particular, it was shown that B cells could negatively regulate immunity through provision of interleukin (IL)-10 during autoimmune and infectious diseases in mice. Here, we review data on the suppressive functions of B cells in mice with particular emphasis on the signals controlling the acquisition of such suppressive functions by B cells, the phenotype of the B cells involved in the negative regulation of immunity, and the processes targeted by this inhibitory circuit. Finally, we discuss the possibility that human B cells might also perform similar inhibitory functions through the provision of IL-10, and review data suggesting that such B cell-mediated regulatory activities might be impaired in patients with autoimmune diseases.

Interleukin-10-producing B cells and the regulation of immunity - PubMed (nih.gov)