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Are chilblains common?

Persimmon

Senior Member
Messages
135
There's a recent post about people getting strange, hard bumps on their hands.

This prompted me to wonder how many of us get chilblains. I do, though not nearly as much as I used to when I was sicker. They flared up this last winter during a relapse. My drs put it down to my circulation being screwed up, and in particular Raynaud's syndrome. None of this happened before ME/CFS onset, and other factors cannot explain it (ie moving to a colder climate).

So, do lots of you get chilblains (as well as cold fingers and hands)?
 

dsdmom

Senior Member
Messages
397
I've always had cold fingers/toes - even way before I was sick. But I only started getting chilblains in the last couple of years on my toes in the colder months. They hurt like heck!!!!
 

allyann

Senior Member
Messages
418
Location
Melbourne Australia
chilblains connected to Autoimmune Connective Tissue diseases

Michelle, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chilblains has a good explaination.

Chilblains are acral ulcers (that is, ulcers affecting the extremities) that occur when a predisposed individual is exposed to cold and humidity. They are red blisters that form on your toes and fingers.

I had really bad chilblains as a child. I wear socks and boots now all through the winter so I don't get them that often. The worst was when I used to wear court shoes and stockings, standing at the railway station in the morning. By the time I got to work they would be bleeding. I do have other bad circulation problems though and get celulitis from cuts on my feet.

I have always had them so I have not noticed a difference since getting ME/CFS. Wikipedia does say that you can be predisposed to it and it is connected to Autoimmune Connective tissue diseases (Systemic lupus erythematosus, Rheumatoid arthritis, Scleroderma, Sjgren's syndrome, Mixed connective tissue disease). I wonder if the recent Rituximab indications of an autoimmune connection is relative in this context too.

Allie
 

Persimmon

Senior Member
Messages
135
Chilblains used to be relatively common among those living in colder climates (eg the UK) in the days before central heating. They readily occur in the absence of any other medical condition, where extremities get cold and circulation isn't adequate enough to keep the fingers/toes warm enough. I'd never heard of them until after I came down with ME - I had to ask a dr what they were.
 

taniaaust1

Senior Member
Messages
13,054
Location
Sth Australia
I live in Australia so Chilblaines arent a common thing here...
but I got them so bad when I was in my 30s (I had had ME for a while then) that I was not able to fit my shoes on my feet to go to my part time work, due to my swollen toes. I also had Raynauds. (doctor put me on Niacin I think it was (a B vitamin) i help the chillblaines.

Im sure both those things were due to the ME. I dont nowdays tend to get Chillblaines nor Raynauds anymore. (I think the change in the circulation issues I used to have is probably due to my Blood pressure shifting from hypotension to orthostatic hypertension and often now being at lot higher then it once was).