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Antioxidant therapy during infections

adreno

PR activist
Messages
4,841
A recent study documented that vitamin C, α-tocopherol, carotenes, selenium, and flavonoids are the most commonly ingested antioxidants in the United States (16). These common antioxidants are beneficial in the treatment and prevention of chronic disorders. For example, there is an inverse relationship between β-carotene and vitamin C ingestion and the incidence of breast cancer in premenopausal women (46, 47). Additionally, studies suggest that diets rich in flavonoids reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease in humans and rodent models (48, 49). Due to positive effects in various disease models, there are currently 1,986 clinical trials using antioxidants (www.clinicaltrials.gov).

However, while antioxidant ingestion may play a role in the prevention of chronic disorders, our results have important implications for supplementation during acute immune responses. Our study demonstrates that antioxidant with superoxide dismutase activity has a negative effect on virus-specific ASC, antibody titer, and affinity and suggest that antioxidant supplements should be suspended during infection and immunization.
http://jvi.asm.org/content/87/5/2577.full
 

adreno

PR activist
Messages
4,841
These two articles (both of which I find remarkable) from Orthomolecula.org appear to clearly contradict these conclusions.
The "articles" didn't reach any "conclusions", because no study was performed.

I suppose in the end we each have to evaluate the quality of evidence on our own.
 

msf

Senior Member
Messages
3,650
I think the first paper is more likely to be correct, since the oxidative response to infection must be the product of evolution.