ADHD in girls: How is it different? 2019 article

pattismith

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ADHD in girls: Symptoms, early warning signs, and complications (medicalnewstoday.com)

According to the Child Mind Institute, girls may remain without a diagnosis because their symptoms are often different from boys and do not tick the more obvious signs and symptoms boxes.

There are three types of ADHD:

Inattentive only: The person has difficulty paying attention but does not tend to be disruptive.

Hyperactive and impulsive: The person may be able to focus well, but their hyperactive and impulsive behavior can cause disruption in a classroom, for example.

Combined inattentive, hyperactive and impulsive: The person has all the above symptoms.

The main signs and symptoms of ADHD can apply to both boys and girls, but according to some studiesTrusted Source, girls are more likely to have the inattentive form.
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lenora

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Our oldest daughter had the last type but she is now 50 years old. Then, ADHD wasn't recognized in most boys and definitely not girls. Being bright was not her problem....she could pull a 'D' up to an 'A' on her next report card and her pediatrician suggested that a new school may be the answer. We already had her on the waiting list for a private school. (Note: It would have been the opposite if we had put her in private school first. A change was required.) Every teacher she ever had complained about her...right from nursery school.

I had to re-teach her classroom work each and every day. A lot of difficulty for both of us since she really couldn't concentrate. No drugs then, ritalin had just come on the market and it made her suicidal. It was an effort for all of us to teach her. At university she did get into trouble with alcohol, but we immediately took her back for counseling both on and off campus.

Today, b/c of that outgoing personality, she graduated from a good school, university and she earns more than her husband (I'm sure). She is highly successful, has maintained a long-term marriage and has two children at university. Neither has any sign of ADHD (but it can skip generationally). She still has some difficulty but controls things herself. I do think it's imperative to see if other learning disorders go along with the ADHD. Those years were difficult, but remember that ones with the combo effect can learn to hyper-focus. That's good. Yours, Lenora.
 
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I had to re-teach her classroom work each and every day. A lot of difficulty for both of us since she really couldn't concentrate. No drugs then, ritalin had just come on the market and it made her suicidal. It was an effort for all of us to teach her. At university, she did get into trouble with alcohol, but we immediately took her back for counseling both on and off campus.
@lenora, your daughter is very fortunate you were so involved in helping her to learn. It doesn't seem like most parents would be as willing or caring. She was lucky to have good parenting.
 
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lenora

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Thanks @christiankatz. Those years were definitely difficult, but we made it through. The school (which was supposed to be excellent...the reason we moved to the suburbs), was of no help whatsoever b/c something like ADHD simply didn't exist. Even today I don't believe there is a definative test, but the Scottish Rite Hospital had a team of doctors who reached a consensus on who/who didn't have the illness. It took us about 4 yrs. to get her in, but she was put in the definite category. I would suggest such a hospital in your area...if you need and have one. This is totally free of charge and you can make a donation if you so desire.

Today she thanks me (us....b/c we had to enter counseling to help her and ourselves). Like I said, she's now 50 and understands, but I'm not so sure she was always grateful back then. Another illness that had absolutely no information until she was probably in 9th or 10th grade. But you know that something's wrong....just pay attention, have them read aloud to you, listen to the complaints of the teachers...the signs are there.

Our other daughter was the total opposite. Both are wonderful, but where have the years gone? Yours, Lenora.
 
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