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Activity perception in chronic fatigue syndrome and asthma: development of a new measure

Dolphin

Senior Member
Messages
17,567
http://www.ehps2016.org/files/EHPS2016_Abstracts_Book_08082016.pdf

15:30 - 17:00
Activity perception in chronic fatigue syndrome and asthma: development of a new measure

I. Alexeeva1, M. Martin1
1University of Oxford, United Kingdom

Background: The study aimed to assess a number of dimensions of activity: occupation, exercise,
active living habits, leisure, walking, and sedentary behaviours in one measure of daily activity or
regular lifestyle.

Methods: An activity scale was developed in order to investigate the patterns and types of activity and
inactivity in CFS, asthma, and healthy control groups. The types of activities measured included
leisure and sport, activity at home, outside, and on the Internet, social activity, work and education,
mental effort. The scale also aimed to measure the construct of inactivity, as represented by
sedentary behaviours, such as staying in bed during the day.

Findings: For the CFS group increased symptoms, fear of movement, and depressed mood were
associated with an increase in sedentary behaviours. More online activity in the CFS group was
related to more frequent symptoms, stronger beliefs in the seriousness of illness, and higher negative
affect. Involvement in community activities or education was associated with stronger beliefs in the
seriousness of illness, anxiety and behavioural disengagement, but also with greater physical
functioning.

Discussion: The results showed a pattern of significant correlations between the scores on the activity
scale and other measures of functioning and activity in the CFS and asthma groups. The lack of
significant relations between the new activity scale and other measures of activity and functioning
within the healthy control group indicated the measure may be more suitable for assessing activity
patterns in groups with chronic illness than in healthy people.

Via this tweet:
 

Sean

Senior Member
Messages
7,378
Findings: For the CFS group increased symptoms, fear of movement, and depressed mood were
associated with an increase in sedentary behaviours. More online activity in the CFS group was
related to more frequent symptoms, stronger beliefs in the seriousness of illness, and higher negative
affect. Involvement in community activities or education was associated with stronger beliefs in the
seriousness of illness, anxiety and behavioural disengagement, but also with greater physical
functioning.
So which direction is the causation running?
 

Keela Too

Sally Burch
Messages
900
Location
N.Ireland
Definitely @Sean they have it all back to front.

Recently my physical health has improved due to a treatment, and look at what changes I've had:
  • I have less fear about the effects of moving about on my future wellbeing
  • I'm feeling a load more mentally buoyant (okay I never actually got "depressed" as such, but mood is better)
  • I'm much less sedentary
  • I'm online less
  • I have fewer symptoms
  • I have way fewer negative effects from being ill
I still believe this is a VERY serious illness though, because I have been very physically low, and have seen how low others can go with this. That doesn't change, now that I'm physically improving, BUT perhaps if I'd never been so low, and never interacted with those I know to be low, then I mightn't think the illness serious?

But all those changes are down to my health improving. "Making" those change won't improve my health!!

Surreal the type of studies they think meaningful.

It's a bit like observing that men who wear hats are often bald, and so blaming the hat wearing for making the men bald without considering that the bald men wear hats to keep their heads warm! Oh and then suggesting that bald men should never wear hats if they want to grow their hair back!
:p
 
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