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Chronic fatigue syndrome and idiopathic intracranial hypertension

Discussion in 'Latest ME/CFS Research' started by JaimeS, Aug 11, 2017.

  1. JaimeS

    JaimeS Senior Member

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    Just saw this in medical hypotheses: http://www.medical-hypotheses.com/article/S0306-9877(17)30418-8/pdf

    Though not discussed in the medical literature or considered in clinical practice, there are similarities between chronic fatigue syndrome and idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) which ought to encourage exploration of a link between them. The cardinal symptoms of each – fatigue and headache – are common in the other and their multiple other symptoms are frequently seen in both. The single discriminating factor is raised intracranial pressure, evidenced in IIH usually by the sign of papilloedema, regarded as responsible for the visual symptoms which can lead to blindness. Some patients with IIH, however, do not have papilloedema and these patients may be clinically indistinguishable from patients with chronic fatigue syndrome. Yet IIH is rare, IIH without papilloedema (IIHWOP) seems rarer still, while chronic fatigue syndrome is common. So are the clinical parallels spurious or is there a way to reconcile these conflicting observations?

    We suggest that it is a quirk of clinical measurement that has created this discrepancy. Specifically, that the criteria put in place to define IIH have led to a failure to appreciate the existence, clinical significance or numerical importance of patients with lower level disturbances of intracranial pressure. We argue that this has led to a grossly implausible distortion of the epidemiology of IIH such that the milder form of the illness (IIHWOP) is seen as less common than the more severe and that this would be resolved by recognising a connection with chronic fatigue syndrome.

    We hypothesise, therefore, that IIH, IIHWOP, lesser forms of IIH and an undetermined proportion of chronic fatigue cases are all manifestations of the same disorder of intracranial pressure across a spectrum of disease severity, in which this subset of chronic fatigue syndrome would represent the most common and least severe and IIH the least common and most extreme.
     
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  2. Valentijn

    Valentijn Senior Member

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  3. kangaSue

    kangaSue Senior Member

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    I've seen it suggested that left renal vein compression (Renal Nutcracker Syndrome) can cause a slight increase in intracranial pressure so maybe that leads to intracranial hypertension too. It's certainly known to be a cause of POTS

    When the left renal vein is compressed, the blood flow from the kidney that usually drains into the inferior vena cava can reflux into the spinal canal to cause the increased intracranial pressure, something called midline congestion syndrome I think.
     
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  4. helperofearth123

    helperofearth123 Senior Member

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    Two of the researchers of this study have tried treatments for this on me. I had a lumber puncture, and I felt better for a few days after that. They said that this suggests I have brain inflammation as the drained cerebral spinal fluid creates more space for the brain. But there was no way to make the effects permanent.

    They also did a jugular venoplasty on me, because scans showed there was a slight narrowing of my veins. This is where they insert balloons inside the vein to make it widen to increase blood flow. The first time they did it I thought I felt a mild improvement but felt nothing the second time.

    In the end we gave up though I was left with the offer of having a neck stent put in. I decided not to having not fet enough improvement from the venoplasties.

    I'm lucky they tried it out on me but unfortunately it didn't work.
     
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  5. pibee

    pibee Senior Member

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    whee did you do jugular procedure? do they have experience w other ME patients? i guess you'e speaking of CCSVI?
     
  6. pattismith

    pattismith Senior Member

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    this paper is really interesting, so many ME patients have head pressure, they may have undiagnosed low grade IHH, it makes sense.

    I did myself a trial with Diamox (acetazolamide), a drug used to treat IHH and I got clear improvement, I gave some details here.
     
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  7. kangaSue

    kangaSue Senior Member

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  8. pattismith

    pattismith Senior Member

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    Thank you, this "theory" seems to me a mixing of things with some lack of evidences. but I notice that again the vascular theory is showing up:

    "CCSVI (Chronic Cerebrospinal Venus Insufficiency) Stenosed (narrowed) veins in the cervical region result in poor blood and CSF drainage, contributing to the cycle of building pressure above the brain. Angioplasty can open the narrowed veins and restore proper drainage. This is a big area of research in MS"

    this theory seems to be better supported by studies and may be present at less in a CFS/ME subgroup suffering with head pressure.

    This what Dr Higgins seems to be thinking at less.

    Here the full scientific publication from him ( he is the doc who also wrote the article at the top of this thread) where he found focal narrowing in jugular veins from CFS/ME patients with headache (see attached file).

    The problem is that all the patient he has treated with venoplasty found some improvement but relapsed more or less quickly, so this surgery doesn't seem to be the right answer.

    I used Diamox and found improvement (although I don't know if it will work on the long run), but I wonder if some venodilatator could do the job...

    I wish to add that high vitamine A intake has previously shown to trigger intracranial hypertension, so when a supplement makes you worse, better not insist on it...
     

    Attached Files:

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  9. Awags1986

    Awags1986

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    Not sure if it could cause IHH, but at the onset of my symptoms I asked to have my serum renin drawn and it was triple what it ought to be. Renin stimulates angiotensin and vasoconstriction, correct? What could cause such high renin? Does anyone else have this lab anomaly as well? Could this cause IHH?
     
  10. kangaSue

    kangaSue Senior Member

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    If it's causing hypertension too, renal artery stenosis or Fibromuscular Dysplasia (FMD) as a cause of secondary aldosteronism (and cause renovascular hypertension).
    The most important cause of secondary aldosteronism is narrowing of the blood vessels that supply the kidney, renal artery stenosis. This causes high blood pressure due to high renin and aldosterone and may be cured by surgery or angioplasty. FMD can cause a narrowing of the renal arteries
    Sometimes only one kidney is affected and an angiogram (catheter inserted through the groin) to collect blood directly from the veins draining the kidney (renal vein renin levels) can be done to see If the value is significantly higher in one side or the other to then indicates where the narrowing of the artery is present.
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28060190
     
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  11. Wayne

    Wayne Senior Member

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    I experienced a lot of head pressure for many years, and tried many different things to try to relieve some of that pressure. A number of manipulative techniques helped me, but the thing that I use on a daily basis to relieve this pressure is DMSO. I wrote fairly extensively about my DMSO experiences over on HR this past year on this thread:

    POTS Inexplicably Improves After Topical DMSO Applications


    I got inspired to use DMSO after reading that conventional medicine has discovered it to be the best therapy for people who experience closed head injuries. Reducing the intracranial pressure as quickly as possible is of the utmost importance, and many people die before being able to accomplish that. DMSO starts working within minutes to reduce that pressure.

    I figured if it is so good for a critical head injury, it just might be helpful for the chronic pressure and inflammation I've experienced for years. It did, and even improved my POTS at the same time. The two main qualities of DMSO is that it improves circulation and reduces inflammation, so it's not surprising that it would be helpful for OI.​
     
    Last edited: Jul 3, 2018
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  12. pattismith

    pattismith Senior Member

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    Diamox (acetazolamide) also efficient in reducing migraines!

    extract:

    "One study has investigated acetazolamide efficacy in sporadic migraine with and without aura, demonstrating a reduction in the frequency of attacks in both migraine types [21].

    This effect is explained by two possible mechanisms. The first one sees migraine deriving from cerebral oligemia [22, 23], and acetazolamide acting through vasodilatation.

    The second attributes migraine to a possible disorder of neuronal ion channels [21]. This last mechanism is the one thought to be responsible for the acetazolamide mechanism of action in familial ion channels disorders, such as familial hemiplegic migraine, hypokalemic periodic paralysis and episodic ataxia type 2 [2426]. One can hypothesize that one of the above-mentioned mechanisms or even both are present also in CADASIL migraine."
     
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  13. wastwater

    wastwater Senior Member

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    I think CADASIL comes under familial leukoencephalopathy
     
  14. dreamydays

    dreamydays

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    Also consider topiramate for IIH and/or constant headaches. For an herbal option boswellia is mildly effective.
     
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  15. JaimeS

    JaimeS Senior Member

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    Huh! Already taking Boswellia in my B-vit blend.
     

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