What does low homocysteine indicate? Anyone else?

ChookityPop

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P-Homocystein


umol/L 3,1

Test Ref.
3,1 *5,0 - 15,0

Low homocysteine levels do indeed have disease correlations. For example, low homocysteine has been shown to have a strong association with peripheral neuropathy. A surprising 41% of patients with idiopathic peripheral neuropathy have hypohomocysteinemia.
https://www.drkarafitzgerald.com/2017/04/04/low-homocysteine-concern/

Individuals with low homocysteine have limited capacity for response to oxidative stress and certain kinds of toxin exposure.

How low is too low? Data suggests that a low limit of 4.0 nmol/mL should be what flags you to a homocysteine level that indicates a potential need for support, either supplemental and/or diet/lifestyle.

Treatment
sulfur-containing amino acids such as methionine, N-acetylcysteine and taurine.

Preformed glutathione and inorganic sulfate salts (potassium sulfate) may also be employed.
 
Last edited:

nerd

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Maybe you take too much B12 or TMG OR you have a methylation blockage/insufficiency. It's generally difficult to tell without knowing at least one other methylation marker, such as metionine levels. But since you receive B12 injections, I assume that this is the reason. Maybe replace some of the animal protein with eggs. If you stop the B12 injections, it can go the other way round. Maybe it's possible to reduce the injection dose.
 

pamojja

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Treatment
sulfur-containing amino acids such as methionine, N-acetylcysteine and taurine.
Just checked my old notes from labtestanalyzer. Also didn't have much more information than you already found out:

Homocysteine

This test measures the levels of the amino acid homocysteine.

This test can help determine if you are folate- or vitamin B12-deficient. It can also tell if you are at increased risk of heart attack or stroke. Finally, it helps diagnose a rare inherited disorder called homocystinuria.

Homocysteine is an amino acid your body produces from another amino acid, called methionine. It is usually found in very small amounts in your body. That’s because your body converts it efficiently into other products, such as cysteine, with the aid of vitamins B6, B12, and folate (B9). Higher homocysteine can indicate a deficiency of these vitamins [R].

Higher levels of homocysteine contribute to the narrowing and hardening of the arteries, and may increase the risk of heart disease [R].

Higher levels of homocysteine are also associated with other diseases including:
  • Depression [R]
  • Dementia [R, R]
  • Alzheimer’s disease [R]
  • Parkinson’s disease [R]
  • Osteoporosis [R, R]
A high-protein meal can significantly increase homocysteine levels. Therefore, you should fast throughout the night before your blood test to ensure the most accurate results [R].


Range
umol/L

Sub-Optimal < 4.99

Optimal 5 - 9

Supra-optimal 9.01 - 15

High 15.01 - 99.99

Critical > 100


Optimal
Your homocysteine levels are optimal!

This suggest that your body is able to make efficient use of important vitamins in your diet, such as vitamin B6, B9 (folate), and B12.

Based on your homocysteine levels, you have the lowest risk of dying of all causes [R, R, R, R, R, R].


Low
Your homocysteine levels are lower than normal.

Homocysteine is necessary for the production of factors important for detoxification. Low homocysteine may restrict detoxification pathways that respond to oxidative stress [R].

Low homocysteine is associated with nerve damage of unknown cause (idiopathic peripheral neuropathy) [R].

Make sure your diet is well-balanced. Homocysteine is produced from the amino-acid methionine. Your diet should include enough methionine-rich foods, such as beef, lamb, turkey, pork, fish, shellfish, cheese, eggs, dairy, nuts, soy, and beans.

Supplements that can help:
  • Methionine [R]



High
Your homocysteine is above normal!

Based on your homocysteine levels, you have a higher risk of dying of all causes [R, R, R, R, R, R].

Homocysteine can be increased by:
  • Low vitamin B12 levels [R, R]
  • Low vitamin B6 levels [R]
  • Low folate levels [R, R]
  • Vegan diet [R]
  • Stress [R, R, R]
  • Smoking, or exposure to second-hand smoke [R, R]
  • Alcohol [R, R]
These drugs can increase homocysteine levels:
  • Methotrexate (Trexall, Rheumatrex), an immunosuppressant [R, R]
  • Metformin (Glucophage), used in diabetes [R]
  • Cholestyramine (Questran), used to lower cholesterol [R]
  • Antiepileptics, such as valproate (Convulex, Depakote, Epilim), carbamazepine (Tegretol) and phenytoin (Dilantin) [R, R, R]
Higher homocysteine levels are also encountered in:
  • Psoriasis [R]
  • Sleep apnea [R]
  • Lupus [R]
  • Autism [R, R]
  • Kidney disease [R, R]
  • Hypothyroidism [R]
  • Gut disorders [R]
  • Multiple sclerosis [R]
As homocysteine levels increase, so does all-cause mortality [R].

The best way to prevent high homocysteine levels is to make sure you consume a balanced diet, containing adequate amounts of B vitamins. These can be acquired by eating lots of fruits and vegetables, whole grains, dairy, eggs, fish, and non-processed meat [R, R, R, R, R].

Check your folic acid levels. If low, include more folic acid sources into your diet. Cereal grains are the main source of folic acid [R].

Check your vitamin B6 levels. If low, consume more vitamin B6-rich foods. Fruits and vegetables have significant amounts of vitamin B6 [R].

Check your vitamin B12 levels. If these are low, you can increase them by consuming more red meats, poultry, fish, and other seafood [R].

Exercise regularly. Although exercise increases homocysteine short-term, in the long term, it is associated with lower homocysteine levels. Resistance exercise seems to be the most beneficial [R, R].

Reduce and manage stress. A study has shown that yoga may help reduce elevated homocysteine levels [R].

Supplements that can help lower homocysteine levels:
  • B12 (if deficient) [R]
  • B6 (if deficient) [R]
  • 5-MTHF (folate) [R, R, R, R]
  • N-acetylcysteine [R, R]
  • Beta-carotene [R]
  • Probiotics [R]
  • Omega-3s [R, R]
  • Resveratrol [R]
  • Betaine [R, R]
However, it does suggest animal protein might be beneficial, B-vitamins might not play much role if suffcient, and NAC might lower it even further.
 

ChookityPop

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Maybe you take too much B12 or TMG OR you have a methylation blockage/insufficiency. It's generally difficult to tell without knowing at least one other methylation marker, such as metionine levels. But since you receive B12 injections, I assume that this is the reason. Maybe replace some of the animal protein with eggs. If you stop the B12 injections, it can go the other way round. Maybe it's possible to reduce the injection dose.
At the time of the test I actually did not take any b vitamins. I have never tested methionine but I want to test to see if I have any methylation issues. Im very interested in finding that out, but I wonder if I have to send tests out the country.
I had low b12 when I first got sick and have sporadically gotten b12 injections but far between and I have taken b12 and b complex sporadically as well. My b12 levels are super high, almost the double amount of the max ref range. So you think that if I stop b vitamins all together the homocysteine can rise and potentially be too high?
 

ChookityPop

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Just checked my old notes from labtestanalyzer. Also didn't have much more information than you already found out:



However, it does suggest animal protein might be beneficial, B-vitamins might not play much role if suffcient, and NAC might lower it even further.
Thanks for sharing!
I eat lots and lots of animal protein. Very interesting about NAC. The only way to find out for sure is to test for methylation issues?
 

nerd

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I had low b12 when I first got sick and have sporadically gotten b12 injections but far between and I have taken b12 and b complex sporadically as well. My b12 levels are super high, almost the double amount of the max ref range. So you think that if I stop b vitamins all together the homocysteine can rise and potentially be too high?
If it was too low without injections, it probably won't get too high without injections. If it was too low without injections, there might be another issue with the degradation of SAMe. See this post for the different theories on methylation.

At the time of the test I actually did not take any b vitamins. I have never tested methionine but I want to test to see if I have any methylation issues. Im very interested in finding that out, but I wonder if I have to send tests out the country.
Methionine and Homocysteine would have to measured at the same time, optionally SAMe and SAH as well.