The 12th Invest in ME Conference, Part 1
OverTheHills presents the first article in a series of three about the recent 12th Invest In ME international Conference (IIMEC12) in London.
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treatment options for herpes?

Discussion in 'Antivirals, Antibiotics and Immune Modulators' started by alice111, Mar 10, 2015.

  1. alice111

    alice111 Senior Member

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    Canada
    ok, so I realize that's a big question.. but im wondering if people could please list the different options out there for treating herpes (specifically HSV 1 and 2)
    i am aware of a few different options, not sure what the pros and cons/ success rates are


    also, can these things be applied to other herpes viruses such as EBV, CMV HHV 6?

    - antivirals
    -immune modulators
    -immune support supplements
    -chelation?
    -root cause treatments?
    - prevention/ treating outbreak?
     
  2. halcyon

    halcyon Senior Member

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    A number of the *cyclovirs work against HSV 1 and 2. Not all of them work equally against all other herpes viruses. There's a table somewhere but I can't seem to find it.

    In terms of prevention of outbreaks, there seems to be some evidence that l-lysine can be helpful.
     
  3. SOC

    SOC Senior Member

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    Valtrex and Famvir are the first-line antivirals for HSV-1 and -2. There are alpha-, beta-, and gamma-herpesviruses and different antivirals work better for different subfamilies. So the antiherpetic best for HSV (HHV-1 and -2) is not the best antiherpetic for HHV-6 or CMV (HHV-5). Multiple antiherpetics might be used at the same time if you have multiple active infections in different subfamilies.

    Immune modulators and support supplements could help, but if you already have autoimmune tendencies (and I think many of us do) you could make things worse taking supplements that affect the immune system without knowing what is wrong (if anything) with your immune system.

    What do you mean by root cause treatments? The root cause is the HSV virus and it's not curable, just manageable.

    HSV infections are well-documented, so any GP and certainly any ID doc should have lots of information and a clear treatment plan. It seems like getting the advice of a knowledgeable physician would be your best plan. S/he would know a lot more about pros/cons and success rates for treating HSV than a bunch of PWME.
     
    halcyon likes this.
  4. zzz

    zzz Senior Member

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    Tagamet.

    Yes, the same Tagamet that's normally used as an antacid.

    From an earlier post of mine:
    Here's the first paragraph from the conclusion of the Life Extension Magazine article mentioned in the above quote:
    The article as a whole is quite interesting, and there are many studies cited.
     
    Last edited: Mar 11, 2015
    Diwi9 likes this.
  5. ahmo

    ahmo Senior Member

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    Locally, I get excellent results applying tea tree oil. I've had excellent results with olive leaf extract. I got some sort of anti-viral from my GP when my outbreaks were at their worst. I tolerated this for a short time, but had my typical histamine/overloaded liver response. that's when I started olive leaf. I've had very little herpes activity over the past year, maybe my overall detox strategy has had some positive effect.
     
  6. drob31

    drob31 Senior Member

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    Is it possible to be asymptomatic?

    Also, how do you know which HHV variant you have?

    Has everyone been tested for EBV/titer count?
     

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