Phoenix Rising tells QMUL: release the PACE trial data
Mark Berry, Acting CEO of Phoenix Rising, presents the Board of Directors’ open letter to Queen Mary University of London (QMUL) urging them to release the PACE trial data, and hopes that other non-UK organisations will join British charities in the same request...
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Researchers overturn landmark study on the replicability of psychological science

Discussion in 'Other Health News and Research' started by Sean, Mar 12, 2016.

  1. Sean

    Sean Senior Member

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    Just gets more and more confusing, doesn't it. o_O :rolleyes:

    https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/03/160303145733.htm

     
  2. Chrisb

    Chrisb Senior Member

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    I am sure that any possible conflicts of interest will have been declared.
     
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  3. TiredSam

    TiredSam The wise nematode hibernates

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  4. A.B.

    A.B. Senior Member

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    The funny thing is that replicability doesn't even mean the results are true. It may just mean that the same biases leading to the false appearance of a result are present.

    I recall one study where a placebo was as good as asthma medication if one only looked at subjective measures. Only looking at objective measures revealed that the placebo actually made no difference. Studies of psychological interventions rarely look at objective measures. When they do, they may simply ignore inconvenient null results on objective measures (PACE being a good example)

    Yes, we cannot compare psychotherapy to placebo, but that is no excuse for not even trying to minimize bias, because there are other ways as well.

    It's a junk science factory.
     
  5. Jonathan Edwards

    Jonathan Edwards "Gibberish"

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    I think these harvard boys and girls should be promoted to milk monitors and given a badge for doing what Sir likes. Of course the original paper was totally subjective and hyped - but that would make up for all the fiddled replications wouldn't it.
     
    Justin30, Invisible Woman and Sean like this.
  6. Gijs

    Gijs Senior Member

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    Where is the psyche? In what place? Can someone show me on mri? The psyche does not exist objectively. Conclusion: psychological illnesses are nonsense. We are our brains.
     
  7. Snow Leopard

    Snow Leopard Hibernating

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    60%? Gee, I'm so impressed! Crisis over!
     
    Last edited: Mar 14, 2016
  8. *GG*

    *GG* senior member

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    Concord, NH
    When we compared the replication rates of the endorsed and unendorsed protocols, we discovered that the endorsed protocols were nearly four times as likely to produce a successful replication (59.7%) as were the unendorsed protocols (15.4%).

    This strongly suggests that the infidelities did not just introduce random error but instead biased the replication studies toward failure. If OSC had limited their analyses to endorsed studies, they would have found that 59.7% [95% confidence interval (CI): 47.5%, 70.9%] were replicated successfully.

    In fact, we estimate that if all the replication studies had been high enough in fidelity to earn the endorsement of the original authors, then the rate of successful replication would have been 58.6% (95% CI: 47.0%, 69.5%) when controlling for relevant covariates.

    Remarkably, the CIs of these estimates actually overlap the 65.5% replication rate that one would expect if every one of the original studies had reported a true effect.

    Although that seems rather unlikely, OSC’s data clearly provide no evidence for a “replication crisis” in psychological science.

    Breaking this up, to much freaking text in a large block!

    GG
     
  9. alex3619

    alex3619 Senior Member

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    Yes. Also that a significant result can be significant bias. Significance is not truth.
     
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