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New paper: On chronic fatigue syndrome and nosological categories. Feb 2018

Discussion in 'Latest ME/CFS Research' started by Countrygirl, Feb 13, 2018.

  1. Countrygirl

    Countrygirl Senior Member

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    in Rheumatol. 2018 Feb 7. doi: 10.1007/s10067-018-4009-2. [Epub ahead of print]
    On chronic fatigue syndrome and nosological categories.
    Sharif K1,2, Watad A1,2, Bragazzi NL3, Lichtbroun M1,2, Martini M4, Perricone C4,5, Amital H1,2, Shoenfeld Y6,7.
    Author information

    Abstract
    Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) is a heterogeneous disease which presents with pronounced disabling fatigue, sleep disturbances, and cognitive impairment that negatively affects patients' functional capability. CFS remains a poorly defined entity and its etiology is still in question. CFS is neither a novel diagnosis nor a new medical condition. From as early as the eighteenth century, a constellation of perplexing symptoms was observed that resembled symptoms of CFS. Commencing with "febricula" and ending with CFS, many names for the disease were proposed including neurocirculatory asthenia, atypical poliomyelitis, Royal Free disease, effort syndrome, Akureyri disease, Tapanui disease, chronic Epstein-Barr virus syndrome, and myalgic encephalitis. To date, it remains unclear whether CFS has an autoimmune component or is a condition that precedes a full-blown autoimmune disease. Research suggests that CFS may overlap with other diseases including postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome (POTS), autoimmune syndrome induced by adjuvants (ASIA), and Sjögren's syndrome. Additionally, it has been postulated that the earliest manifestations of some autoimmune diseases can present with vague non-specific symptoms similar to CFS. Sometimes only when exposed to a secondary stimulus (e.g., antigen) which could accelerate the natural course of the disease would an individual develop the classic autoimmune disease. Due to the similarity of symptoms, it has been postulated that CFS could simply be an early manifestation of an autoimmune disease. This paper will provide a historical background review of this disease and a discussion of CFS as an entity overlapping with multiple other conditions.

    KEYWORDS:
    Autoimmune syndrome induced by adjuvants; Chronic fatigue syndrome; Myalgic encephalomyelitis; Postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome

    PMID:

    29417255

    DOI:

    10.1007/s10067-018-4009-2


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    Mel9, jesse's mom, ljimbo423 and 5 others like this.
  2. andyguitar

    andyguitar Senior Member

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    It was also called 'Americanitis'. In about the 1870s. So called because it was thought to effect people in that country more than in the UK. Cause was supposed to be linked to 'fast living in a big city'. Read this in a book years ago. Was published over 100 years ago. Cant remember the title. Best treatment was supposed to be a diet of only boiled milk for a month. Anyone tried that?
     
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  3. pibee

    pibee Senior Member

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    A bit funny. :rofl::cry:That's what they told us here in Balkans, "only Americans have this.. CFS thing, not you" hahaha
     
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  4. andyguitar

    andyguitar Senior Member

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    Somewhere I read that it is "only Anglo Saxons that get it". I suspect a lot of this is due to cultural differences in describing, and naming an illness.
     
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  5. pibee

    pibee Senior Member

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    it sounds just another atempt to stigmatize it and make it less biological looking.

    I was shocked and pissed to hear that "only Americans get CFS" from the same neuroligists who actually acknowledge it's likely autoimmune. You have to be 8 year old child to not know that autoimmune illnesses are not unique for some cultures (in Western world, not going into do some tribes in 3rd world have AI)
     
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