Volunteer opportunity: Organizing Phoenix Rising articles
This section contains all the articles that have been published by Phoenix Rising over the years. As you will see if you browse here, some of the articles are outdated--either the research has been superseded or retracted or the article features an event or campaign that is now in...
Discuss the article on the Forums.

Guardian Article: Lack of funding for migraine research (identical to ME situation)

Discussion in 'Other Health News and Research' started by OverTheHills, Nov 7, 2016.

  1. OverTheHills

    OverTheHills

    Messages:
    462
    Likes:
    1,034
    New Zealand
    https://www.theguardian.com/lifeand...ut-migraines-but-were-in-too-much-pain-to-ask

    Extracts:
    One in seven people around the world suffer from migraine. In the UK, migraine has a crippling economic effect, with approximately 25m days lost every year, costing the country £2.3bn. But while the condition has been studied since the time of the ancient Greeks – who attempted to treat it with trepanning, by drilling a hole into the skull to release evil spirits – it remains poorly understood with few adequate treatments.

    Why don’t we know more?
    Serious research into migraine began only relatively recently, as for a long time many doctors believed that it was a psychosomatic condition produced by people being unable to deal with stress. “It was a disorder that most obviously affected women and so wasn’t taken as seriously,” Loder says. “And it’s a pain disorder. Pain is subjective: we don’t have any way of measuring it, which can make it very hard for people to believe it’s real. Plus, on top of all of that, it’s episodic, so between attacks, sufferers may look perfectly well.”

    The fact that migraine is researched at all owes a lot to the development of the medication methysergide in 1960, which was found to eliminate headaches in weeks. The drug is no longer commercially available as it was found to have serious side-effects, but its legacy remains. What had been perceived as a psychological condition clearly had a biological basis. “The market is, of course, very big,” Loder says. “It’s a common disorder, it lasts decades. So, that made pharmaceutical companies sit up and take notice; money poured into the field; it improved and professionalised research.”

    However, migraine receives much less funding, compared with similarly debilitating conditions. Studies looking at money allocated by the US National Institute of Health, for example, have shown that migraine is considerably underfunded.


    :bang-head::bang-head::bang-head::bang-head::bang-head::bang-head:
    OTH
     
    trishrhymes, SamanthaJ and mermaid like this.
  2. Skippa

    Skippa Anti-BS

    Messages:
    841
    Likes:
    2,962
    2 questions:

    1) (serious) did trepanning work?

    2) how did migraines make the leap from psychological "all in their heads" (haha pun) to physical ailment we know little about?
     
  3. mermaid

    mermaid Senior Member

    Messages:
    621
    Likes:
    1,140
    Cornwall, UK
    @Skippa re your 2) question - don't they explain this in the article re the 'development of the medication methysergide in 1960'? It was then seen to be biological because migraine responded so well to the medication. If a magic medicine did this for ME/CFS then presumably attitudes would change too.

    Having read the article it seems that I have bucked the usual trend re migraine as I have always had migraine aura but had a definite increase post menopause when my ME/CFS really kicked in, and even greater increase after an ME/CFS relapse. Unusually maybe, I don't really get headache, but I get the neurological symptoms of feeling hungover the next day, with muscle weakness and feeling of fatigue and confusion.

    I have tried a lot of things to try to prevent them, but prefer a supplement/herbal approach as the triptans do not stop the aura from starting. I take all the right B vits and magnesium but as yet the migraine aura is not affected by them. Now I am trying Feverfew, and I think it's helping with the aura.I have also 'clocked' in the past few weeks (taken me nearly a lifetime!) that I suffer from histamine intolerance, so I think getting on top of this will make a big difference.

    Unfortunately I also get Retinal migraine occasionally too - not the same as usual migraine aura in one eye only, and relates to the blood vessels behind the eye.
     
    Skippa and sarah darwins like this.
  4. Skippa

    Skippa Anti-BS

    Messages:
    841
    Likes:
    2,962
    Thanks @mermaid yeah if only a med really helped a majority of us.
     
  5. worldbackwards

    worldbackwards Senior Member

    Messages:
    2,051
    Likes:
    10,246
    mermaid, sarah darwins and SamanthaJ like this.
  6. Snow Leopard

    Snow Leopard Hibernating

    Messages:
    4,649
    Likes:
    12,552
    South Australia
    Migraine is nasty, but not quite as disabiling as ME and receives around 4x more research spending than ME/CFS each year. Despite this, it is an outlier in lack of spending just like ME.
     
    Skippa likes this.
  7. OverTheHills

    OverTheHills

    Messages:
    462
    Likes:
    1,034
    New Zealand
    What led me to draw attention to this article is the great similarity to our situation - ignored because of doctor's psychosomatic attribution , hard to measure, womens disease, fluctuating, not fatal.

    Migraine history demonstrates the same systemic problems we suffer with, but it seems no amount of evidence of the incorrect assumptions and prejudice or costs caused to society leads to a change in the system.

    I just hope that Rituximab will be our methysergide.
     
    trishrhymes and Skippa like this.
  8. IreneF

    IreneF Senior Member

    Messages:
    1,552
    Likes:
    2,575
    San Francisco
    My mother suffered from migraines. In her case, they were stress-related, but there had to be some biological underpinning. She had a (probably) undiagnosed and undertreated anxiety disorder.
     

See more popular forum discussions.

Share This Page