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Easy Online Course on Fermented Foods for Healing CFS

Discussion in 'The Gut: De Meirleir & Maes; H2S; Leaky Gut' started by I AM Phoenix, Jan 6, 2019.

  1. I AM Phoenix

    I AM Phoenix

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    "Though underappreciated, the link between ME/CFS and gastrointestinal symptoms is well documented. In a very recent comprehensive review of the current evidence, Navaneetharaja et al. (2016) proposed that the intestinal microbiota and in particular members of the virome are a source of the “infectious” trigger of ME/CFS. One study found that 92% of ME/CFS patients have co-existent irritable bowel syndrome. Additionally, significantly higher levels of Enterococcus and Streptococcus and lower levels of Bifidobacteria bacterial species has been reported in ME/CFS patients with 77% of them having some form of bacterial overgrowth." - Source: Shout Out About Me

    So this Winter I am studying "Functional Fermented Food" with The Foundation for Functional Fermented Food. It is a way to heal the gut microbiome with beneficial bacteria found in abundance in properly prepared fermented food. I uploaded the table of contents from my course manual for your review.

    I am doing their self-paced online course (6.5 hours total but each module is short) which is perfectly suited for my level of energy and ability to concentrate. I do one module at a time. I can pause and restart or rewind when needed. It's easy to follow, well done and engaging. Because of my brain fog and fatigue I want to stress to you that I am able to do this course with ease. I know that will be a concern for many people.

    The woman who designed the course experienced her own serious health conditions similar to what we in this group are going through, CFS, bed bound, pain, Levaquin poisoning, and she is healed -- not yet completely she says because her case was catastrophic but far better off than she was a decade ago when a naturopath told her she had ~5 yrs to live. I belong to several fermenting groups on FB and she is highly regarded as being very knowledgeable. I also find her to be a warm and compassionate woman. Case in point: She offers scholarships to her live trainings (not sure about the online course but you can apply). She also talks about bone broth, the Weston Price Foundation, The GAPS diet, and Sally Fallon Nourishing Traditions as complementary nutritional therapies to fermented foods.

    I do not feel that the course creator is trying to scam anyone or trying to simply make money off of ill people. I feel that she genuinely cares about helping other people like her who suffer to get well.

    I know that many of us, myself included, often do not have the energy to cook. But certain fermented foods are super easy and fast to prepare -- take kvass for example. It is a fermented drink -- just put veggies in a jar with salt and water and let it ferment. On my worse day I can even manage that much. BTW this is like the Gut Shot sold at Whole Foods for $8 for a small bottle. And on good days I am able to make other fermented foods in batches and store them in the pantry. They are shelf stable.

    The entire beginning of the course focuses on healing the body with fermented foods, including conditions of CFS, Fibromyalgia, and IBS (and more). Then it goes into the process of fermenting and offers many recipes, including medicinal ferments. I've spoken with at least one person who has had a very good improvement with this protocol. I know that may not sound convincing -- but the fact is that I was not searching for people who took her training and this person just happened to identify that it helped his wife a great deal.

    I wish everyone would take a serious look at this course. A few years ago before I was as sick as I am now, I worked with a PhD in clinical nutrition and she always stressed the importance of fermented foods and diet for my condition. And when I stopped following her protocol, I got really really sick, exactly as she said was the almost certain outcome if I did not heal my gut. Dr. Byron Hyde describes ME CFS as a bi-phasic illness that begins in the gut. I can say for me it surely did. I know the exact day it happened and I ended up hospitalized.

    Please check it out and consider if you can work it into your healing protocol. Good luck to us all. http://www.functionalfermentedfood....dUhgGXegMjJtLV9OgLWyLkOIjbJf6KWWzgTdpL22nhaf4
     

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  2. ljimbo423

    ljimbo423 Senior Member

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    Thank you for the post- great information! I am also completely convinced that my ME/CFS started in my gut.

    I am making a lot of other changes rate now, so I'm not ready to do the fermented foods yet. I will be doing them in the near future though!

    One big reason is because to get the amount of probiotics in one jar of fermented food would cost a small fortune in good probiotics that I buy in supplements. Where the jar fermented food might only cost $1 or less.

    I agree 100% with this statement in your signature!! I have improved my health considerably by treating my gut.

    Although it has been slow because I haven't been able to tolerate high doses of antibiotic herbs. I have come a long, long way and continue to improve!:):thumbsup:
     
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  3. I AM Phoenix

    I AM Phoenix

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    @ljimbo423 that is an excellent point that you bring up about the cost of probiotic supplements versus fermented foods. I know that manufacturers have a difficult time getting the probiotics to live in that natural environment (encapsulated).

    What have you found effective in healing your gut?
     
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  4. ljimbo423

    ljimbo423 Senior Member

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    Primarily antibiotic herbs like oil of oregano, ceylon cinnamon, etc, probiotics and a low starch diet. I couldn't tolerate even small amounts of these antibiotic herbs at first.

    So I took a course of Rifaximin and that allowed me to take higher doses of antibiotic herbs with much less die-off symptoms from killing off the bacteria in my gut.

    So many of us turn away from treating our gut because of the horrendous side effects (die-off symptoms) from killing off the bacterial overgrowth. I did that on and off for years.

    Now I am learning new ways of minimizing the die-off, so I can continuously treat my gut. The longer I treat my gut the healthier I get.

    I also have learned that supplements that increase mitochondrial function, greatly help to minimize die-off.
     
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  5. PatJ

    PatJ Forum Support Assistant

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    This protocol for yeast overgrowth and leaky gut uses digestive enzymes in large quantities to minimize die-off induced nausea.

    From the linked article:
    Some people also use activated charcoal to reduce die-off symptoms.
     
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  6. Strawberry

    Strawberry Senior Member

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    FYI I used to be the fermentation queen. Pickles, kombucha, kimchee, there isn't much I have not fermented. I still continued to slowly decline. Now I am to the point that I don't have enough energy to do anything with fermentation.

    Also, be cautious if you have mast cell issues. I couldn't eat anything fermented for a while, minus a little bit of parmesan cheese on my salad.

    I truly miss those days, such yummy foods and drinks! I felt like I was getting a huge vitamin punch, but it did nothing towards making me feel any better. I hope it works better for you.
     
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  7. I AM Phoenix

    I AM Phoenix

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    @Strawberry I am so very sorry that you had this experience. I am glad that you posted to give "fair balance" to fermented foods. It is so frustrating that treatment is so individualized. I wish there was a clear-cut path for all of us to follow toward healing.

    I've used fermented foods before but they were store bought. So I already know that they help me. Homemade raw goat milk kefir has been life changing -- the only thing that allows me to have normal bowel movements. It is a godsend. I have suffered with chronic constipation for years; it is so bad that I have a hernia from it.

    In my case, my illness began in the gut. And I have a bacterial overgrowth. Plus I have nutritional deficiencies (likely as a result). So many of my doctors believe that healing my gut is a priority. I pray God that I can and it does unwind this mess.

    Regarding the mast cells, I think this is aggravated by histamine, right? I know many people have histamine problems but not quite sure of the details of it. But I believe that fermented foods are thought to be high in histamine. The course has a section on this topic, which I have not gotten to yet. And I am wondering if it is that food incorrectly fermented are high in histamine and if correctly fermented are not? I am hoping that is the case. I intend to update this post when I learn that.
     
  8. Strawberry

    Strawberry Senior Member

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    I honestly have no idea. When you find out, please tag me! From what I understand, the histamine comes with the age of the food (since harvest) and that salt and sugar (the two main fermentation ingredients) don't lower the rate that histamine increases. But with my experiences, that theory doesn't quite sit right with me.

    All that I DO know is that things started affecting me, and I had to quit eating it. Once my reactions lessened, I went WOOHOO! and made a batch of kimchee. I never once even tasted it. I finally just tossed it after 6 months. I used to get intense cravings for all my goodies, and when you aren't feeling well and you just dip into a bottle of pickled organic veggies? So easy and satisfying knowing there are no preservatives or chemicals. And now my body just does not want it. AT ALL. I recently bought two bottles of kombucha, and never opened them. I keep trying to reintroduce them, and just can't make myself touch it. It makes me sad.

    Again, please do tag me, I'm not online here much and I will forget about this thread. And I really want to know what you find out about histamine, and how this whole thing goes for you. Also, my best tip for you on your fermentation adventure is to get this book:

    https://www.wildfermentation.com/wild-fermentation-2nd-edition/

    It is my bible. WAS.... Best of luck!
     
  9. I AM Phoenix

    I AM Phoenix

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    @Strawberry that books looks amazing! I asked the course developer about properly preparing ferments and histamine:

    ""properly" in this context is a tough word to respond to. If the vessel properly seals, and there is enough time, the histamine levels are far lower. If the vessel doesn't seal, then the histamine levels are far higher."
     
  10. Strawberry

    Strawberry Senior Member

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    So I assume they are teaching airlock fermentation. That would be interesting to find out if that method is lower histamine than my mason jars. I would think "enough time" would create more histamine. But what do I know!
     

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