Choline on the Brain? A Guide to Choline in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome
http://phoenixrising.me/research-2/the-brain-in-chronic-fatigue-syndrome-mecfs/choline-on-the-brain-a-guide-to-choline-in-chronic-fatigue-syndrome-by-cort-johnson-aug-2005
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A Metabolic Trap for ME/CFS?

Discussion in 'Latest ME/CFS Research' started by Janet Dafoe (Rose49), Apr 4, 2018.

  1. wigglethemouse

    wigglethemouse Senior Member

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    Loved the video @Belbyr. Thanks for posting. However in his paper on the work in 2012 he presented this
    Cytokine expression profiles of immune imbalance in post-mononucleosis chronic fatigue
    Link : https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3480896/
    I'd have to rewatch the video to see it what specific context he mentions IL6 and IL10. From Figure 1 in the paper the effect of IL6 looks small compared to the cytokines 8 and 23

    This study by Broderick et al looked at Cytokine signatures in ME/CFS and GWI and found males and females behaved differently. Exercise also changed cytokine expression significantly.
    A comparison of sex-specific immune signatures in Gulf War illness and chronic fatigue syndrome
    Link : https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3698072/

    Montoyas 2017 study added a correction factor for gender but did not present results separated. IL6 and IL10 were not mentioned in the abstract
    Cytokine signature associated with disease severity in chronic fatigue syndrome patients
    https://www.pnas.org/content/114/34/E7150

    So it seems it's more complicated......................

    ETA: In Broderick's 2012 paper he says this and provides examples of differences in other studies.
     
    Last edited: Jan 11, 2019
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  2. Tally

    Tally Senior Member

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    Please keep in mind that despite what the article or the authors say this study has absolutely nothing to do with CFS. It was a study on hep C patients who developed prolonged fatigue due to interferon-alpha treatment.

    It was also a study conducted by King's College London shudder

    David Tuller explained it nicely here http://www.virology.ws/2019/01/07/trial-by-error-more-thoughts-on-the-interferon-study/
     
  3. Belbyr

    Belbyr Senior Member

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    I understand that, there is correlation as Cort J pointed out.
     
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  4. Tally

    Tally Senior Member

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  5. nandixon

    nandixon Senior Member

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    Just making a note here for myself because I didn't read the NOVA article the first time around, and to clarify for others, that “phenylalanine suppression” is referring to suppression of the phenylalanine pathway. Therefore, the patients referred to would likely have been found to have increased blood (serum/plasma) levels of phenylalanine. Whereas most ME/CFS patients, as Armstrong found, are more likely to have decreased levels.

    There's probably not a discrepancy though because the (potential) ME/CFS patients in the article are only 24 months out from having had infectious mononucleosis.
     
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  6. bread.

    bread.

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    @mariovitali

    Hi,

    I am a very severly affected patient from Austria with a bell scala of 0.

    I think you could be onto something.

    Liver (high enzymes early on in my disease, gigh bile acids postprandial 2 hours), Gallblader and Digestion (Sibo, Maldigestion, Malabsoprtion and fat stool), muscle wasting, itching and severe PEM are my main issues.

    I also have POTS, MCAD and EDS.

    So it is most likely only one of many issues, but probably important and maybe actionable.


    So what is the status quo?


    Thank you!
     
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  7. pattismith

    pattismith Senior Member

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    Would this theory fit with the high women/men ratio for ME/CFS?


    (Knowing that estrogens increase serotonin by TRPH activation + MAO inhibition, an excess of serotonin in the brain may be more sensitive?)
     

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