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Queensland Government: Gold Coast researchers make chronic fatigue breakthrough

Discussion in 'General ME/CFS News' started by Kati, Feb 20, 2017.

  1. Kati

    Kati Patient in training

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    Gold Coast researchers make chronic fatigue breakthrough

    In a world first, Gold Coast researchers have made an important breakthrough in understanding the cause of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome.

    Science Minister Leeanne Enoch said researchers from Griffith University’s National Centre for Neuroimmunology and Emerging Diseases (NCNED) have found strong evidence that chronic fatigue syndrome was associated with a dysfunctional immune system.

    “The research team, led by Professor Sonya Marshall-Gradisnik and Professor Don Staines, have identified a dysfunctional cell receptor in the immune system which seems to be at the core of the problem,” Ms Enoch said.

    “This discovery is great news for all people living with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS) and the related Myalgic Encephalomyelitis (ME), as it confirms what people with these conditions have long known - that it is a ‘real’ illness - not a psychological issue.

    “CFS and ME are notoriously difficult to diagnose, with sufferers often going for years without getting the proper care and attention they need. Currently, there is no effective treatment.

    “The Griffith University breakthrough now means we have a target for therapeutic intervention, which is welcome news to the 250,000 Australians believed to be affected by CFS and ME.”

    Health Minister Cameron Dick praised researchers for working hard to help people suffering from CFS and ME.

    “According to ME/CFS Australia, the cost to the Australian community of CFS/ME diagnosis, treatment and management is estimated to reach more than $700 million annually,” Mr Dick said.

    “But that is nothing compared to the devastating impact the conditions have on sufferers, along with their families and friends.

    “I am thrilled that funding from our Government is playing a hand in changing people’s lives for the better.”

    Professor Marshall-Gradisnik said Queensland Government funding had been critical in progressing the research.

    “The Queensland Government has funded NCNED continuously since 2008, totalling about $1.6 million all up, enabling the research centre to be a world leader in chronic fatigue research. This is the largest direct contribution of any government anywhere in the world to chronic fatigue syndrome research,” Professor Marshall-Gradisnik said.

    “It clearly demonstrates what can be achieved with critical government funding.”

    The NCNED also received a $4 million grant from the Stafford Fox Medical Research Foundation – the largest grant ever provided for CFS/ME research.

    Professor Don Staines said this funding would be used to investigate the commercialisation of a diagnostic test the research team were developing as well as potential treatments.

    “This is a huge boost to our research effort, enabling us to really look at how we can overcome this debilitating illness,” Professor Staines said.

    Griffith Vice Chancellor Professor Ian O’Connor welcomed the ongoing support from the Queensland Government.

    “The most effective research is now coming more often from powerful collaborations such as this,” Professor O’Connor said.
     
    Binkie4, Cohen2, Mel9 and 35 others like this.
  2. Never Give Up

    Never Give Up Collecting improvements, until there's a cure.

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    Very encouraging!
     
    Mel9, MEMum, MeSci and 1 other person like this.
  3. helen1

    helen1 Senior Member

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    Anyone have any more info about what this dysfunctional cell receptor is, what it does and where it is?
     
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  4. Marky90

    Marky90 Science breeds knowledge, opinion breeds ignorance

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    I think this is based on an old paper discussed here before
     
  5. allyann

    allyann Senior Member

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  6. eljefe19

    eljefe19

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    I'm confused what exactly is the breakthrough here?
     
  7. alex3619

    alex3619 Senior Member

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    The breakthrough does not appear to be new. What I think is happening is that any research advance is considered a wonder when involving ME and CFS. Most ministers, doctors etc. do not follow the research like we do. Having said that if they can develop a commercial test, then validate it properly, that would be really good.
     
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  8. Kati

    Kati Patient in training

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    It never hurts for Griffith U to do some public relation campaigning. It benefits both patients and researchers.
     
    PennyIA, anniekim, thane17 and 11 others like this.
  9. Never Give Up

    Never Give Up Collecting improvements, until there's a cure.

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    TrixieStix, Chezboo, L'engle and 7 others like this.
  10. alicec

    alicec Senior Member

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    The study was discussed here. It is a preliminary observation - there's a long way to go for anything definitive.
     
    Chezboo, simeyss, Esther12 and 6 others like this.
  11. Joh

    Joh Inactivist

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    Chezboo, Jan, trishrhymes and 3 others like this.
  12. trishrhymes

    trishrhymes Senior Member

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    I remember reading about this. It concerned me that they seem to be talking big on the basis of a tiny study.

    I can understand they need to talk up what is, in effect, a pilot study, in order to bid for funding for a bigger study.

    I also got the impression that they were cagey about exactly what they had found, and we're intending to patent rather than openly share whatever test they develop.

    Getting the media involved in hyping it up at this early stage is risky as the fallout if it doesn't pan out as hoped could be immensely detrimental, both to their reputations as researchers, and to ME sufferers.
     
    NexusOwl, Lolo, Binkie4 and 16 others like this.
  13. ash0787

    ash0787 Senior Member

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    damn I got excited for a minute, this is another problem I always noticed with the news, when they don't make 'fake news' or intentional slander the articles are essentially useless, they don't give any specific details or its a story that is monthes old but suddenly several papers are suddenly reporting it as if its super relevant
     
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  14. adreno

    adreno PR activist

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    Sounds like hype to me.
     
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  15. Silencio

    Silencio Senior Member

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    A very hopeful media release (although doesn't link to a published paper) today from Australian researchers at the National Centre of Neuroimmunology and Emerging Diseases:
    • ME associated with a dysfunctional cell receptor in the immune system
    • NCNED have developed a diagnostic blood test for ME which they are looking to commercialise
    • potential treatments on the horizon

    http://www.heraldsun.com.au/news/na...h/news-story/893e8b8326fd5d293cbad43659ff73f4

    QUEENSLAND scientists have linked chronic fatigue syndrome to a dysfunctional immune system, providing more evidence the disorder is physiological rather than psychological.

    Griffith University research has identified a defective cell receptor in the immune system of people with chronic fatigue syndrome which they hope will lead to a definitive test for the disorder and eventually, an effective treatment.

    Queensland Science Minister Leeanne Enoch announced the breakthrough on the Gold Coast today at the university’s National Centre for Neuroimmunology and Emerging Diseases, which has received about $1.6 million in state government funding since 2008.

    “This discovery is great news for all people living with chronic fatigue syndrome and the related myalgic encephalomyelitis, as it confirms what people with these conditions have long known — that it is a ‘real’ illness — not a psychological issue,” Ms Enoch said.

    “CFS and ME are notoriously difficult to diagnose, with sufferers often going for years without getting the proper care and attention they need. Currently, there is no effective treatment.”

    Ms Enoch said the announcement would be welcome news to the 250,000 Australians believed to be affected by the disorders.

    Lead researcher Professor Sonya Marshall-Gradisnik said that apart from Queensland Government funding, the university had also received a $4 million grant from the Stafford Fox Medical Research Foundation to further their work into chronic fatigue and myalgic encephalomyelitis.

    Her colleague Professor Don Staines said the funding would be used to investigate the commercialisation of a diagnostic test the research team was working on as well as potential treatments.

    Original press release:
    http://statements.qld.gov.au/Statem...researchers-make-chronic-fatigue-breakthrough
     
    Last edited: Feb 21, 2017
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  16. Silencio

    Silencio Senior Member

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    This quote comes from Susan Sandford on the ME CFS Lyme Assoc of WA Facebook page:

    "Went this morning to NCNED to hear Qld Science and Technology Minister announce the findings of an immune deficiency and ME/CFS; the receptors do not allow the transfer of calcium into the cells. New funding of $4,000,000 over 5 years from the Stafford Fox Medical Research Foundation will enable the research to further develop a diagnostic test, look for a drug in the laboratory and educate more doctors about this illness. Afterwards had morning tea and then lunch with the team. Channels 7 & 9 were there, ABC did a phone interview later with Don Staines. A representative from Qld Health came and is enthusiastic as was the Vice Chancellor. These researchers believe that it is this fault in the calcium ion transfer which underlies all of the other findings. My husband is a trustee of the Stafford Fox Medical Research Foundation."
     
    PennyIA, mango, Mel9 and 9 others like this.
  17. Helen

    Helen Senior Member

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    Great news @Silencio .

    Thanks for the amazing information.
     
    Last edited: Feb 21, 2017
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  18. arewenearlythereyet

    arewenearlythereyet Biscuit Antagonist

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    Sounds interesting. Would this also explain the low magnesium in CFS? Sounds like this could link in nicely with the rest of the research going on?

    Reading the statement it makes me ashamed to be from the uk. The statement is so well written it really makes me want to roll it up tightly and shove it somewhere in the direction of our health minister.
     
    PennyIA, carer51, ukxmrv and 5 others like this.
  19. Gijs

    Gijs Senior Member

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    Isn't this 'old' news from some time ago?
    And how does this NK /calcium problem explains this disease?
    It is a long way to go when you can say; breakthrough.
     
    Last edited: Feb 21, 2017
  20. AndyPR

    AndyPR Cookies for Tired Sam

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