The 12th Invest in ME Conference, Part 1
OverTheHills presents the first article in a series of three about the recent 12th Invest In ME international Conference (IIMEC12) in London.
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Low level inflammation caused by Advanced Glycation End Products?

Discussion in 'General ME/CFS Discussion' started by drob31, May 20, 2017.

  1. drob31

    drob31 Senior Member

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    AGE's are a new concept for me, but here's a primer:

    http://thepaleodiet.com/rage-of-ages-advanced-glycation-end-products/

    Basically when sugar and proteins mix, it can create AGE's which are pretty bad and cause low level inflammation. It turns out that these kind of things would have been at pretty low levels until we started processing food in the last century or two. And, even the paleo diet isn't perfect because some things, like fried bacon are high in AGE's.

    It all started when I was researching benfotiamine. And I came across this article:

    https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT00446810

    It's not really the type two diabetes I was interested in, but the cytokines, mainly TNF-a, and the endothelial dysfunction link. I seem to commonly have some sort of endothelial dysfunction, but only after eating.




    Is avoiding AGE's a key?


    @Hip
     
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  2. Hip

    Hip Senior Member

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    I posted some info on the possible benefits of avoiding advanced glycation end products (AGEs) here and here.
     
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  3. aquariusgirl

    aquariusgirl Senior Member

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  4. kangaSue

    kangaSue Senior Member

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    Brisbane, Australia
  5. Gondwanaland

    Gondwanaland Senior Member

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    Could you please describe it?
    Please check the thread on anti-glycation supplements.
     

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