XMRV review in Nature Reviews Urology

Messages
1,471
Likes
5
Location
UK
http://www.nature.com/nrurol/journal/vaop/ncurrent/abs/nrurol.2010.77.html

The human retrovirus XMRV in prostate cancer and chronic fatigue syndrome
Robert H. Silverman, Carvell Nguyen, Christopher J. Weight & Eric A. Klein About the authors

top of page
Abstract
Xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus (XMRV) is an authentic, newly recognized human retrovirus first identified in prostate cancer tissues from men with a deficiency in the innate immunity gene RNASEL. At present, studies have detected XMRV at widely different rates in prostate cancer cases (027%) and in patients with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS; 067%). Indirect or direct modes of carcinogenesis by XMRV have been suggested depending on whether the virus was found in stroma or malignant epithelium. Viral replication in the prostate might be affected by androgens, which stimulate XMRV through a transcriptional enhancer site in viral DNA. By contrast, host restriction factors, such as APOBEC3 and tetherin, inhibit virus replication. Immune dysfunction mediated by XMRV has been suggested as a possible factor in CFS. Recent studies show that some existing antiretroviral drugs suppress XMRV infections and diagnostic assays are under development. Although other retroviruses of the same genus as XMRV (gammaretroviruses) cause cancer and neurological disease in animals, whether XMRV is a cause of either prostate cancer or CFS remains unknown. Emerging science surrounding XMRV is contributing to our knowledge of retroviral infections while focusing intense interest on two major human diseases.

top of page
Author affiliations

R. H. Silverman, C. Nguyen, C. J. Weight & E. A. Klein
Department of Cancer Biology, Lerner Research Institute, Cleveland Clinic, 9500 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH 44195, USA (R. H. Silverman). Glickman Urologic and Kidney Institute, Cleveland Clinic, 9500 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH 44195, USA (C. Nguyen, C. J. Weight, E. A. Klein).

Correspondence to: R. H. Silverman silverr@ccf.org

Published online 1 June 2010
 
Messages
1,471
Likes
5
Location
UK
The CFIDS Association have added this to facebbok.

The CFIDS Association of America In the June 1, 2010 issue of Nature Reviews Urology, Robert Silverman and colleagues at the Cleveland Clinic published a detailed, 11-page review of the data on XMRV in prostate cancer and CFS. They suggest that, “In CFS, XMRV infection of blood cells could trigger immune suppression leading to secondary infections and effects on the central nervous system.”

Their final paragraph summarizes the current state of CFS studies of XMRV and implications: “At present, [XMRV] has been associated with two major human diseases (prostate cancer and CFS) in some studies, but not others. ... The presence of XMRV in CFS is a more recent finding that awaits independent confirmation and validation in multiple laboratories; ideally in blinded studies. However, if a role for XMRV in CFS is established it could have far-reaching implications. In particular, while XMRV has not been proven to cause disease, if a link is established with prostate cancer, CFS, or other disease, more effective and more specific diagnostics, treatments and prevention (that is, vaccination) all remain distinct possibilities. Finally, if sufficient risk exists of disease caused by XMRV infection, screening of donated blood to prevent transmission through transfusion might eventually be deemed prudent and necessary.”
 

George

waitin' fer rabbits
Messages
851
Likes
80
Location
South Texas
hmmm, soooo

So what we are waiting for as patients is for XMRV to be proven to cause disease. It took 3 years to even get XMRV on the radar. (from 2006 to 2009) The WPI study showed that possibility and got researchers interested in the virus. Now someone needs to design a study that shows at least a tentative cause and effect. Because while the researchers may be interested the bureaucrats are holding the purse strings and without money the research will stall.

So what now . . .?

P.S. nice one V99
 

Adam

Senior Member
Messages
495
Likes
2
Location
Sheffield UK
Dr. Coffin says the only way to prove X causes Y, or in this case XMRV causes disease (CFS) is to lob drugs at it and see what happens.

I think I got that right. In fact, Gerwyn said it, so it must be true.

Whady'a reckon George, cos I'm no scientist?
 
C

Cloud

Guest
"Recent studies show that some existing antiretroviral drugs suppress XMRV infections and diagnostic assays are under development".

"Infection" implies in vivo.....misuse of words, or have I missed some studies on drug effectiveness for xmrv infection.?

And yes, one of the common and intended uses for a medication is diagnostics
 

ixchelkali

Senior Member
Messages
1,107
Likes
275
Location
Long Beach, CA
Has anyone here seen the full text version of Dr Silverman's review yet?

(I wish it didn't cost so much to access a single article in these scientific journals; $32 for one article seems kind of over-the-top to me. It doesn't help when the info you're interested in is spread over umpty different journals.)