Workwell is now offering EEG brain scans pre/post CPET to assess cognitive function in response to exertion.

Pyrrhus

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Workwell is now offering EEG brain scans pre/post CPET to assess cognitive function in response to exertion.

Workwell said:
WHAT IS EEG?

EEG (electroencephalogram) provides a noninvasive objective measure of brain electrical activity at a very high temporal resolution, allowing millisecond-level recordings of brain wave frequency and amplitude via electrodes on the scalp.

Like routine measures such as blood pressure or heart rate, the EEG provides objective information about how the body and brain perform—comparing these measures before and after exercise stress offers measures of brain voltage and reaction time in a post-exertional state.

“What do my results mean?”

Click on our IACFS/ME presentation image below



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halcyon

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Workwell is now offering EEG brain scans pre/post CPET to assess cognitive function in response to exertion.
Do you have any knowledge of how their methodology might compare with any of the other EEG work that has been done on ME patients to date, such as by the late Marcie Zinn, or the Canadian research that I believe Dr. Hyde was involved in? EEG is one of the things I wish I had been able to access before becoming bedbound, I find it really interesting. I just have a really hard time understanding the specifics of how EEG works and so it's unclear to me if all these researchers are looking at basically the same thing in the same way, or if the term EEG is about as useless as the term MRI when it comes to the specifics of the modality.
 

Pyrrhus

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Do you have any knowledge of how their methodology might compare with any of the other EEG work that has been done on ME patients to date, such as by the late Marcie Zinn
All I know is what's printed on their poster presentation from last year's IACFS/ME conference. No publication yet. It looks like they look for patterns in the EEG while the patient performs cognitive tasks.

They use a Fourier transform of the raw EEG data, but I'm not sure if they're referring to quantitative EEG analysis (qEEG), where spatial maps of electrical activity are generated for the parts of the brain close to the scalp.

Mark and Marcie Zinn use eLORETA analysis, which is a different way to generate spatial maps of electrical activity for the parts of the brain close to the scalp. At the the 2014 IACFS/ME conference, I believe they presented the same dataset analyzed by both qEEG and eLORETA in two separate presentations.

I just have a really hard time understanding the specifics of how EEG works and so it's unclear to me if all these researchers are looking at basically the same thing in the same way, or if the term EEG is about as useless as the term MRI when it comes to the specifics of the modality.
Yes, I believe the term EEG is perhaps as useless as the term MRI when it comes to the specifics of the modality...
 

Alvin2

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This thread reminds me that when i had an EEG done years back they had trouble finding communication across the two hemispheres. I never found out what the implications of that is.

BTW is Workwell a clinic?