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Why does cat's claw give me night sweats?

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I suspect I have lyme disease which is not detected in blood tests. Each time I try cat's claw it gives me night sweats, I wake up totally wet in the middle of night. I have tried in past 10 years so many things and I never experienced this with any other supplement, peptides or medicine. I am not sure if this is good or bad thing. Maybe some kind of herx or maybe it just stimulates the immune system too much?
 
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Night sweets usually happen from the spleen / liver / thymus attempting to detoxify itself.. I’ve had them on and off for 7 years since my cfs began. Every time I have strep, a flu, virus etc I can guarantee that exactly 1 month after the initial illness I wake up in drenching sweats with no other apparent symptoms.
The cat claw must be working to detoxify but I always say that night sweats should be checked out by a doctor.
 
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Every time I have strep, a flu, virus etc I can guarantee that exactly 1 month after the initial illness I wake up in drenching sweats with no other apparent symptoms.
I was going thru four t-shirts a nite, and underwear- waking up drenched during and for weeks after the stomach flu.

Will try to ask my herbalist, we use catclaw..what he thinks I see him tomorrow.
 
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I was going thru four t-shirts a nite, and underwear- waking up drenched during and for weeks after the stomach flu.

Will try to ask my herbalist, we use catclaw..what he thinks I see him tomorrow.
Thank you, I appreciate it.
Night sweets usually happen from the spleen / liver / thymus attempting to detoxify itself.. I’ve had them on and off for 7 years since my cfs began. Every time I have strep, a flu, virus etc I can guarantee that exactly 1 month after the initial illness I wake up in drenching sweats with no other apparent symptoms.
The cat claw must be working to detoxify but I always say that night sweats should be checked out by a doctor.
I guess that is a good thing than, at least something is working. I think I will try to use it for a month and see if after 1 month I am still sweating at night.

I don't have night sweat with any other herbs, hormones or medicine. Even mega dose t3 alone didn't make me sweat.
 

Dufresne

almost there...
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I suspect I have lyme disease which is not detected in blood tests. Each time I try cat's claw it gives me night sweats, I wake up totally wet in the middle of night. I have tried in past 10 years so many things and I never experienced this with any other supplement, peptides or medicine. I am not sure if this is good or bad thing. Maybe some kind of herx or maybe it just stimulates the immune system too much?
If you suspect you have Lyme disease then you might want to suspect you also have babesia. The latter is the one associated with night sweats. Sometimes treating one infection tweaks the immune system in a way that causes the other pathogen to shift. Perhaps trying an antimalarial herb to see if it does something similar would be beneficial or informative. For that I'd recommend cryptolepis, neem, or wormwood. I like cryptolepis the best, but it also tastes the worst. :vomit:

Look into the work of Dr Horowitz and Dr Nathan. They're definitely on the same page and great resources for this stuff.

Horowitz conducted a study of 200 patients and found coinfection with a babesia species in 52% of them. So it's very common. Here's an excerpt from that paper:

Many Lyme patients in our study struggled with other tick-borne illnesses. For the current work, we included information on the following tick transmissible infections as well as other infectious agents that participants may have been exposed to during their lifetime (unrelated to tick transmission). These were collected directly from the patient charts using indirect testing, that is, antibody titers (which indicate prior exposure, but not necessarily active infection) and direct testing, that is, PCR, fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) (which are indicative of active infection): Anaplasma, (N=27, 13.5%), Babesia (Babesia microti and Babesia duncani [N=104, 52%]), Bartonella (B. henselae and B. quintana [N=93, positive by titer, PCR, FISH, and/or VEGF, 46.5%]), Brucella (N=20, 10%), Chlamydia pneumoniae (N=102, 51%), cytomegalovirus (N=74, 37%), Coxsackie, (N=15, 7.5%) Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) (N=160, 80%), Ehrlichia (N=29, 14.5%), Helicobacter pylori (N=15, 7.5%), Herpes simplex virus (HSV1) (N=46, 23%), HSV2 (N=23, 11.5%), human herpes virus 6 (HHV6) (N=162, 81%), Mycoplasma (M. pneumonia, M. fermentans, and M. penetrans [N=164, 82%]), Parvovirus (N=23, 11.5%), Q-Fever (Coxiella burnetti [N=17, 8.5%]), RMSF (Rickettsia [N=20, 10%]), Toxoplasmosis (N=23, 11.5%), tularemia (N=33, 16.5%), typhus (N=10,5%), and West Nile Virus (N=13, 6.5%). Participants tested positive for exposure to between 0 and 16 infections (M=5.87, SD=2.29).