Which type of doctor have you found to be the MOST helpful? (POLL)

Which specialists (and/or doctors) have you found to be the most helpful?


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sometexan84

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Which type of specialists (and/or doctors) have you found to be the most helpful in terms of ME/CFS and related symptoms?

In your own personal experience. Think, expectations vs outcome.

Let me know if I missed an important physician type and I'll add it.

Honestly, I have not found many to meet or exceed my expectations. At least my Internal Med doc was a bit open as far as tests I wanted to do and meds I wanted.
 
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Jyoti

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I think this is an interesting question @sometexan84. I have to say that in my case, the doctors who have been most helpful--endocrinologist, functional medicine, neurologist--are/were helpful primarily because of who they are as people, rather than due to a particular skill or knowledge set. Because they listened and believed and wanted very much to help me. I have heard stories about the amplified compassion of cardiologists (all that heart) and it would be really cool to be able to identify a specialty that was more likely to be useful to us. In my situation, though, the most helpful doctors have been, well, kind of unlikely and unexpected.

Maybe something will emerge though. I will watch with interest.
 

sometexan84

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-are/were helpful primarily because of who they are as people, rather than due to a particular skill or knowledge set. Because they listened and believed and wanted very much to help me.
Great point, that's a huge factor, and a good bedside manner I suspect is more common in some types and less common in others.
 
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primarily because of who they are as people, rather than due to a particular skill or knowledge set.
agree- its more about the individual person- but we shall see.....

My GP is "internal medicine" and he personally writes books about capillaries- and I want to chat with him about ours, which I've not been able to do since COVID struck.

My GP Is quite good, yet hardly ever had we conversed about the litany of symptoms of this illness and how many body functions are screwed up in my case.

I've never said to this cardiac specialaist doctor: did you know I have OI and POTS?

Like today my bladder was a mess, having to get the shot. Or my tongue is so swollen it wont fit inside my mouth. The doctor sees none of these things (tongue starts up around 5pm) , nor do i even get aroudn to discussing the litany of our, oh readily 75 SYMPTOMS we can average, on any given day.

My right foot- a big bubble is inside my foot now, making it hard to walk. Wonder what that is?
 

junkcrap50

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Depends entirely on the person and their character: are they intellectually curious, honest, humble, open minded, listen to the patient.

However, a patient will have success based on which symptoms of their is the most obvious in person and in testing. That will take the doctor, of any time, to consider you more seriously and possible treatment options.
 

lenora

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Certain doctors need to be used to rule out other conditions. Thus, a neurologist is a necessity. In my case, my neuro was very young, just starting out and was interested in me and my condition. We developed an easy rapport, which he also did with other patients.

Since he was starting out, he had time to think and talk....both very valuable. I had been sent to him by another doctor who couldn't help me, but saw that something was definitely wrong, probably neurological. In the case of my doctor, the fact that even though he was from L.A. he had volunteered in a Third World country and recognized my primary illness, something which even the profs at the medical school couldn't.

I did have surgery, which was rather excruciating but did save my life. It failed within a year so I was left wandering in the desert again, but did find another neurosurgeon, who had also trained and worked in S. Africa and saw a lot of my second illness there. I had what was then experimental surgery (experimental everywhere in this country) probably 2-5 years later after he had perfected it. It stopped both illnesses from progressing, although I suspect there has been some recent progression. I won't be having surgery again...too many other problems. Bad genetics to begin with which have caused all sorts of problems.

So what I'm saying is this: You never know when you'll find a doctor that you "click" with. All these years later, he has retired but has kept on a few patients. We're both old now, have become friends and have actually worked on getting medications for people who have nerve injuries. All of this b/c I took a chance on a very young man who was just getting started, but had a mind like no one I've met before or since. All of his patients just love his attitude and so do I.

Keep looking until you find someone of this nature. I now take a chance on the younger group...they're inquisitive, have time, will look things up and actually talk to you. Sure, we've disagreed on treatments over the years, but he has always listened to my side of the story before forcing his will on me. He's had some interesting thoughts, I've listened and he has gone on to learn more and more about CFS/FM and other illnesses.

My cardiologist is young, but not inexperienced, my internal medicine will be young (when this one retires). We're complicated patients and become more complicated with age. So have patience in finding the right type of doctor. Go to the ones that are necessary....certain ones simply are, but don't assume that an expert is always that. Someone whose mind is capable is what you're after....someone who is a people person. Yours, Lenora.